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Alaska Occupational Forecast 2018 to 2028

These wage data are grouped into 23 occupational groupings. Go to occupations in a particular category by clicking on a title below.


Use the [More info] links to view the Alaska occupation predictions.

Architecture and Engineering

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
17-0000
Architecture and Engineering Occupations
7126 7769 643 9.02% 186 426 612 676 $48.89
17-1000
Architects, Surveyors, and Cartographers
606 709 103 17% 16 32 48 58 n/a
17-1011
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Architects, Except Landscape and Naval
Plan and design structures, such as private residences, office buildings, theaters, factories, and other structural property. Excludes Landscape Architects (17-1012) and Marine Engineers and Naval Architects (17-2121).
132 147 15 11.36% 3 7 10 12 $47.23
17-1012
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Landscape Architects
Plan and design land areas for projects such as parks and other recreational facilities, airports, highways, hospitals, schools, land subdivisions, and commercial, industrial, and residential sites.
39 44 5 12.82% 1 2 3 4 n/a
17-1021
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Cartographers and Photogrammetrists
Collect, analyze, and interpret geographic information provided by geodetic surveys, aerial photographs, and satellite data. Research, study, and prepare maps and other spatial data in digital or graphic form for legal, social, political, educational, and design purposes. May work with Geographic Information Systems (GIS). May design and evaluate algorithms, data structures, and user interfaces for GIS and mapping systems.
102 112 10 9.8% 3 5 8 9 $39.72
17-1022
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Surveyors
Make exact measurements and determine property boundaries. Provide data relevant to the shape, contour, gravitation, location, elevation, or dimension of land or land features on or near the earth's surface for engineering, mapmaking, mining, land evaluation, construction, and other purposes.
333 406 73 21.92% 9 18 27 34 $42.40
17-2000
Engineers
3975 4273 298 7.5% 83 215 298 328 n/a
17-2011
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Aerospace Engineers
Perform engineering duties in designing, constructing, and testing aircraft, missiles, and spacecraft. May conduct basic and applied research to evaluate adaptability of materials and equipment to aircraft design and manufacture. May recommend improvements in testing equipment and techniques.
41 46 5 12.2% 1 2 3 4 $44.33
17-2041
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Chemical Engineers
Design chemical plant equipment and devise processes for manufacturing chemicals and products, such as gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics, detergents, cement, paper, and pulp, by applying principles and technology of chemistry, physics, and engineering.
62 67 5 8.06% 1 3 4 4 $54.70
17-2051
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Civil Engineers
Perform engineering duties in planning, designing, and overseeing construction and maintenance of building structures, and facilities, such as roads, railroads, airports, bridges, harbors, channels, dams, irrigation projects, pipelines, power plants, and water and sewage systems. Includes architectural, structural, traffic, ocean, and geo-technical engineers. Excludes Hydrologists (19-2043).
999 1077 78 7.81% 21 60 81 89 $48.16
17-2061
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Computer Hardware Engineers
Research, design, develop, or test computer or computer-related equipment for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use. May supervise the manufacturing and installation of computer or computer-related equipment and components. Excludes Software Developers, Applications (15-1132) and Software Developers, Systems Software (15-1133).
55 57 2 3.64% 1 3 4 4 $57.90
17-2071
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Electrical Engineers
Research, design, develop, test, or supervise the manufacturing and installation of electrical equipment, components, or systems for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use. Excludes Computer Hardware Engineers (17-2061).
271 294 23 8.49% 6 13 19 21 $54.26
17-2072
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Electronics Engineers, Except Computer
Research, design, develop, or test electronic components and systems for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use employing knowledge of electronic theory and materials properties. Design electronic circuits and components for use in fields such as telecommunications, aerospace guidance and propulsion control, acoustics, or instruments and controls. Excludes Computer Hardware Engineers (17-2061).
47 44 -3 -6.38% 1 2 3 3 $51.45
17-2081
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Environmental Engineers
Research, design, plan, or perform engineering duties in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental hazards using various engineering disciplines. Work may include waste treatment, site remediation, or pollution control technology.
337 372 35 10.39% 10 17 27 30 $47.81
17-2111
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Health and Safety Engineers, Except Mining Safety Engineers and Inspectors
Promote worksite or product safety by applying knowledge of industrial processes, mechanics, chemistry, psychology, and industrial health and safety laws. Includes industrial product safety engineers.
211 234 23 10.9% 4 11 15 17 $46.44
17-2131
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Materials Engineers
Evaluate materials and develop machinery and processes to manufacture materials for use in products that must meet specialized design and performance specifications. Develop new uses for known materials. Includes those engineers working with composite materials or specializing in one type of material, such as graphite, metal and metal alloys, ceramics and glass, plastics and polymers, and naturally occurring materials. Includes metallurgists and metallurgical engineers, ceramic engineers, and welding engineers.
35 43 8 22.86% 1 2 3 4 $48.11
17-2141
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Mechanical Engineers
Perform engineering duties in planning and designing tools, engines, machines, and other mechanically functioning equipment. Oversee installation, operation, maintenance, and repair of equipment such as centralized heat, gas, water, and steam systems.
329 365 36 10.94% 6 17 23 27 $49.08
17-2151
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Mining and Geological Engineers, Including Mining Safety Engineers
Conduct sub-surface surveys to identify the characteristics of potential land or mining development sites. May specify the ground support systems, processes and equipment for safe, economical, and environmentally sound extraction or underground construction activities. May inspect areas for unsafe geological conditions, equipment, and working conditions. May design, implement, and coordinate mine safety programs. Excludes Petroleum Engineers (17-2171).
173 208 35 20.23% 4 11 15 18 $49.69
17-2171
[More_Info]
Petroleum Engineers
Devise methods to improve oil and gas extraction and production and determine the need for new or modified tool designs. Oversee drilling and offer technical advice.
454 470 16 3.52% 8 26 34 36 $72.30
17-2199
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Engineers, All Other
All engineers not listed separately.
904 935 31 3.43% 19 45 64 67 $55.15
17-3000
Drafters, Engineering, and Mapping Technicians
2545 2787 242 9.51% 87 179 266 290 n/a
17-3011
[More_Info]
Architectural and Civil Drafters
Prepare detailed drawings of architectural and structural features of buildings or drawings and topographical relief maps used in civil engineering projects, such as highways, bridges, and public works. Use knowledge of building materials, engineering practices, and mathematics to complete drawings.
178 205 27 15.17% 6 13 19 22 $35.05
17-3012
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Electrical and Electronics Drafters
Prepare wiring diagrams, circuit board assembly diagrams, and layout drawings used for the manufacture, installation, or repair of electrical equipment.
59 67 8 13.56% 2 4 6 7 $42.66
17-3013
[More_Info]
Mechanical Drafters
Prepare detailed working diagrams of machinery and mechanical devices, including dimensions, fastening methods, and other engineering information.
83 99 16 19.28% 3 6 9 11 n/a
17-3019
[More_Info]
Drafters, All Other
All drafters not listed separately.
103 118 15 14.56% 4 8 12 14 n/a
17-3021
[More_Info]
Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technicians
Operate, install, calibrate, and maintain integrated computer/communications systems, consoles, simulators, and other data acquisition, test, and measurement instruments and equipment, which are used to launch, track, position, and evaluate air and space vehicles. May record and interpret test data.
60 65 5 8.33% 2 4 6 6 n/a
17-3022
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Civil Engineering Technicians
Apply theory and principles of civil engineering in planning, designing, and overseeing construction and maintenance of structures and facilities under the direction of engineering staff or physical scientists.
638 669 31 4.86% 22 42 64 67 $31.02
17-3023
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Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technicians
Apply electrical and electronic theory and related knowledge, usually under the direction of engineering staff, to design, build, repair, calibrate, and modify electrical components, circuitry, controls, and machinery for subsequent evaluation and use by engineering staff in making engineering design decisions. Excludes Broadcast Technicians (27-4012).
251 268 17 6.77% 9 17 26 28 $41.43
17-3024
[More_Info]
Electro-Mechanical Technicians
Operate, test, maintain, or calibrate unmanned, automated, servo-mechanical, or electromechanical equipment. May operate unmanned submarines, aircraft, or other equipment at worksites, such as oil rigs, deep ocean exploration, or hazardous waste removal. May assist engineers in testing and designing robotics equipment.
53 56 3 5.66% 2 4 6 6 $29.73
17-3025
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Environmental Engineering Technicians
Apply theory and principles of environmental engineering to modify, test, and operate equipment and devices used in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental problems, including waste treatment and site remediation, under the direction of engineering staff or scientist. May assist in the development of environmental remediation devices.
212 237 25 11.79% 7 14 21 24 $31.52
17-3027
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Mechanical Engineering Technicians
Apply theory and principles of mechanical engineering to modify, develop, test, or calibrate machinery and equipment under direction of engineering staff or physical scientists.
60 69 9 15% 2 4 6 7 $28.40
17-3029
[More_Info]
Engineering Technicians, Except Drafters, All Other
All engineering technicians, except drafters, not listed separately.
661 722 61 9.23% 23 45 68 74 n/a
17-3031
[More_Info]
Surveying and Mapping Technicians
Perform surveying and mapping duties, usually under the direction of an engineer, surveyor, cartographer, or photogrammetrist to obtain data used for construction, mapmaking, boundary location, mining, or other purposes. May calculate mapmaking information and create maps from source data, such as surveying notes, aerial photography, satellite data, or other maps to show topographical features, political boundaries, and other features. May verify accuracy and completeness of maps. Excludes Surveyors (17-1022), Cartographers and Photogrammetrists (17-1021), and Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and Geographers (19-2042).
174 198 24 13.79% 5 17 22 24 $33.99

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Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports and Media

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
27-1000
Art and Design Workers
828 879 51 6.16% 31 56 87 92 n/a
27-1011
[More_Info]
Art Directors
Formulate design concepts and presentation approaches for visual communications media, such as print, broadcasting, and advertising. Direct workers engaged in art work or layout design.
26 28 2 7.69% 1 2 3 3 $30.31
27-1013
[More_Info]
Fine Artists, Including Painters, Sculptors, and Illustrators
Create original artwork using any of a wide variety of media and techniques.
56 54 -2 -3.57% 3 3 6 6 n/a
27-1019
[More_Info]
Artists and Related Workers, All Other
All artists and related workers not listed separately.
80 81 1 1.25% 4 5 9 9 $24.76
27-1023
[More_Info]
Floral Designers
Design, cut, and arrange live, dried, or artificial flowers and foliage.
85 95 10 11.76% 3 6 9 10 $16.14
27-1024
[More_Info]
Graphic Designers
Design or create graphics to meet specific commercial or promotional needs, such as packaging, displays, or logos. May use a variety of mediums to achieve artistic or decorative effects.
134 139 5 3.73% 4 9 13 14 $30.49
27-1026
[More_Info]
Merchandise Displayers and Window Trimmers
Plan and erect commercial displays, such as those in windows and interiors of retail stores and at trade exhibitions.
298 321 23 7.72% 10 21 31 33 $17.72
27-1029
[More_Info]
Designers, All Other
All designers not listed separately.
70 78 8 11.43% 2 5 7 8 n/a
27-2000
Entertainers and Performers, Sports and Related Workers
1463 1457 -6 -0.41% 78 130 208 207 n/a
27-2011
[More_Info]
Actors
Play parts in stage, television, radio, video, motion picture productions, or other settings for entertainment, information, or instruction. Interpret serious or comic role by speech, gesture, and body movement to entertain or inform audience. May dance and sing.
50 50 0 0% 2 4 6 6 n/a
27-2012
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Producers and Directors
Produce or direct stage, television, radio, video, or motion picture productions for entertainment, information, or instruction. Responsible for creative decisions, such as interpretation of script, choice of actors or guests, set design, sound, special effects, and choreography.
118 107 -11 -9.32% 2 9 11 10 $25.33
27-2021
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Athletes and Sports Competitors
Compete in athletic events.
29 28 -1 -3.45% 2 3 5 5 n/a
27-2022
[More_Info]
Coaches and Scouts
Instruct or coach groups or individuals in the fundamentals of sports. Demonstrate techniques and methods of participation. May evaluate athletes' strengths and weaknesses as possible recruits or to improve the athletes' technique to prepare them for competition. Those required to hold teaching degrees should be reported in the appropriate teaching category. Excludes Athletic Trainers (29-9091).
568 571 3 0.53% 32 51 83 83 n/a
27-2031
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Dancers
Perform dances. May perform on stage, for on-air broadcasting, or for video recording
165 149 -16 -9.7% 10 17 27 25 n/a
27-2042
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Musicians and Singers
Play one or more musical instruments or sing. May perform on stage, for on-air broadcasting, or for sound or video recording.
33 32 -1 -3.03% 2 2 4 4 n/a
27-2099
[More_Info]
Entertainers and Performers, Sports and Related Workers, All Other
All entertainers and performers, sports and related workers not listed separately.
69 74 5 7.25% 3 5 8 8 n/a
27-3000
Media and Communication Workers
1061 1022 -39 -3.68% 36 72 108 104 n/a
27-3011
[More_Info]
Radio and Television Announcers
Speak or read from scripted materials, such as news reports or commercial messages, on radio or television. May announce artist or title of performance, identify station, or interview guests. Excludes Broadcast News Analysts (27-3021).
117 91 -26 -22.22% 4 8 12 9 $21.15
27-3012
[More_Info]
Public Address System and Other Announcers
Make announcements over public address system at sporting or other public events. May act as master of ceremonies or disc jockey at weddings, parties, clubs, or other gathering places.
33 33 0 0% 1 2 3 3 n/a
27-3022
[More_Info]
Reporters and Correspondents
Collect and analyze facts about newsworthy events by interview, investigation, or observation. Report and write stories for newspaper, news magazine, radio, or television. Excludes Broadcast News Analysts (27-3021).
110 87 -23 -20.91% 3 9 12 10 n/a
27-3031
[More_Info]
Public Relations Specialists
Engage in promoting or creating an intended public image for individuals, groups, or organizations. May write or select material for release to various communications media.
277 294 17 6.14% 8 21 29 31 $34.73
27-3041
[More_Info]
Editors
Plan, coordinate, or edit content of material for publication. May review proposals and drafts for possible publication. Includes technical editors.
81 71 -10 -12.35% 2 6 8 7 $25.62
27-3042
[More_Info]
Technical Writers
Write technical materials, such as equipment manuals, appendices, or operating and maintenance instructions. May assist in layout work.
143 158 15 10.49% 5 10 15 16 $33.70
27-3043
[More_Info]
Writers and Authors
Originate and prepare written material, such as scripts, stories, advertisements, and other material. Excludes Public Relations Specialists (27-3031) and Technical Writers (27-3042).
40 38 -2 -5% 2 2 4 4 n/a
27-3091
[More_Info]
Interpreters and Translators
Interpret oral or sign language, or translate written text from one language into another.
64 66 2 3.13% 3 4 7 7 $23.88
27-3099
[More_Info]
Media and Communication Workers, All Other
All media and communication workers not listed separately.
191 180 -11 -5.76% 8 10 18 17 $27.27
27-4000
Media and Communication Equipment Workers
471 440 -31 -6.58% 16 33 49 46 n/a
27-4011
[More_Info]
Audio and Video Equipment Technicians
Set up, or set up and operate audio and video equipment including microphones, sound speakers, video screens, projectors, video monitors, recording equipment, connecting wires and cables, sound and mixing boards, and related electronic equipment for concerts, sports events, meetings and conventions, presentations, and news conferences. May also set up and operate associated spotlights and other custom lighting systems. Excludes Sound Engineering Technicians (27-4014).
180 177 -3 -1.67% 6 13 19 19 $20.41
27-4012
[More_Info]
Broadcast Technicians
Set up, operate, and maintain the electronic equipment used to transmit radio and television programs. Control audio equipment to regulate volume level and quality of sound during radio and television broadcasts. Operate transmitter to broadcast radio or television programs.
70 55 -15 -21.43% 2 5 7 6 $17.41
27-4021
[More_Info]
Photographers
Photograph people, landscapes, merchandise, or other subjects, using digital or film cameras and equipment. May develop negatives or use computer software to produce finished images and prints. Includes scientific photographers, aerial photographers, and photojournalists.
80 78 -2 -2.5% 3 5 8 8 $21.66
27-4032
[More_Info]
Film and Video Editors
Edit moving images on film, video, or other media. May edit or synchronize soundtracks with images. Excludes Sound Engineering Technicians(27-4014).
26 23 -3 -11.54% 1 2 3 3 $22.31
27-4099
[More_Info]
Media and Communication Equipment Workers, All Other
All media and communication equipment workers not listed separately.
67 66 -1 -1.49% 2 5 7 7 n/a

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Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
37-1000
Supervisors, Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Workers
582 614 32 5.5% 24 43 67 70 n/a
37-1011
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Housekeeping and Janitorial Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate work activities of cleaning personnel in hotels, hospitals, offices, and other establishments.
484 514 30 6.2% 21 36 57 60 $23.52
37-1012
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Landscaping, Lawn Service, and Groundskeeping Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of workers engaged in landscaping or groundskeeping activities. Work may involve reviewing contracts to ascertain service, machine, and workforce requirements; answering inquiries from potential customers regarding methods, material, and price ranges; and preparing estimates according to labor, material, and machine costs.
98 100 2 2.04% 3 7 10 10 $38.85
37-2000
Building Cleaning and Pest Control Workers
9420 9904 484 5.14% 623 660 1283 1331 n/a
37-2011
[More_Info]
Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners
Keep buildings in clean and orderly condition. Perform heavy cleaning duties, such as cleaning floors, shampooing rugs, washing walls and glass, and removing rubbish. Duties may include tending furnace and boiler, performing routine maintenance activities, notifying management of need for repairs, and cleaning snow or debris from sidewalk.
5574 5717 143 2.57% 345 398 743 757 $17.24
37-2012
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Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners
Perform any combination of light cleaning duties to maintain private households or commercial establishments, such as hotels and hospitals, in a clean and orderly manner. Duties may include making beds, replenishing linens, cleaning rooms and halls, and vacuuming.
3444 3768 324 9.41% 255 230 485 517 $15.78
37-2019
[More_Info]
Building Cleaning Workers, All Other
All building cleaning workers not listed separately.
340 356 16 4.71% 21 25 46 48 n/a
37-2021
[More_Info]
Pest Control Workers
Apply or release chemical solutions or toxic gases and set traps to kill or remove pests and vermin that infest buildings and surrounding areas.
62 63 1 1.61% 2 7 9 9 n/a
37-3000
Grounds Maintenance Workers
2023 2079 56 2.77% 85 182 267 273 n/a
37-3011
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Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers
Landscape or maintain grounds of property using hand or power tools or equipment. Workers typically perform a variety of tasks, which may include any combination of the following: sod laying, mowing, trimming, planting, watering, fertilizing, digging, raking, sprinkler installation, and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Excludes Farmworkers and Laborers, Crop, Nursery, and Greenhouse (45-2092).
1179 1198 19 1.61% 49 105 154 156 $18.09
37-3012
[More_Info]
Pesticide Handlers, Sprayers, and Applicators, Vegetation
Mix or apply pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, or insecticides through sprays, dusts, vapors, soil incorporation, or chemical application on trees, shrubs, lawns, or botanical crops. Usually requires specific training and State or Federal certification. Excludes Commercial Pilots (53-2012) who dust or spray crops from aircraft.
29 29 0 0% 1 3 4 4 n/a
37-3013
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Tree Trimmers and Pruners
Using sophisticated climbing and rigging techniques, cut away dead or excess branches from trees or shrubs to maintain right-of-way for roads, sidewalks, or utilities, or to improve appearance, health, and value of tree. Prune or treat trees or shrubs using handsaws, hand pruners, clippers, and power pruners. Works off the ground in the tree canopy and may use truck-mounted lifts. Excludes workers who primarily perform duties of Pesticide Handlers, Sprayers, and Applicators, Vegetation (37-3012) and Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers (37-3011).
88 87 -1 -1.14% 4 8 12 12 $29.31
37-3019
[More_Info]
Grounds Maintenance Workers, All Other
All grounds maintenance workers not listed separately.
727 765 38 5.23% 31 66 97 101 $19.92

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Business and Financial Operations

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
13-1000
Business Operations Specialists
7782 7909 127 1.63% 217 545 762 775 n/a
13-1020
Buyers and Purchasing Agents
690 705 15 2.17% 22 51 73 74 $35.77
13-1031
[More_Info]
Claims Adjusters, Examiners, and Investigators
Review settled claims to determine that payments and settlements are made in accordance with company practices and procedures. Confer with legal counsel on claims requiring litigation. May also settle insurance claims. Excludes Fire Inspectors and Investigators (33-2021).
233 233 0 0% 6 14 20 20 $35.54
13-1032
[More_Info]
Insurance Appraisers, Auto Damage
Appraise automobile or other vehicle damage to determine repair costs for insurance claim settlement. Prepare insurance forms to indicate repair cost or cost estimates and recommendations. May seek agreement with automotive repair shop on repair costs.
36 36 0 0% 1 2 3 3 n/a
13-1041
[More_Info]
Compliance Officers
Examine, evaluate, and investigate eligibility for or conformity with laws and regulations governing contract compliance of licenses and permits, and perform other compliance and enforcement inspection and analysis activities not classified elsewhere. Excludes Financial Examiners (13-2061), Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents (13-2081), Occupational Health and Safety Specialists (29-9011), Occupational Health and Safety Technicians (29-9012), Transportation Security Screeners (33-9093), Agricultural Inspectors (45-2011), Construction and Building Inspectors (47-4011), and Transportation Inspectors (53-6051).
730 731 1 0.14% 20 44 64 64 $40.39
13-1051
[More_Info]
Cost Estimators
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.
194 210 16 8.25% 5 15 20 22 $39.64
13-1071
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Human Resources Specialists
Perform activities in the human resource area. Includes employment specialists who screen, recruit, interview, and place workers. Excludes Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists (13-1141) and Training and Development Specialists (13-1151).
625 659 34 5.44% 17 47 64 67 $32.99
13-1075
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Labor Relations Specialists
Resolve disputes between workers and managers, negotiate collective bargaining agreements, or coordinate grievance procedures to handle employee complaints. Excludes equal employment opportunity (EEO) officers who are included in Compliance Officers (13-1041).
134 147 13 9.7% 4 10 14 15 $41.04
13-1081
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Logisticians
Analyze and coordinate the logistical functions of a firm or organization. Responsible for the entire life cycle of a product, including acquisition, distribution, internal allocation, delivery, and final disposal of resources. Excludes Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers (11-3071).
372 392 20 5.38% 9 27 36 38 $45.97
13-1111
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Management Analysts
Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants. Excludes Computer Systems Analysts (15-1121) and Operations Research Analysts (15-2031).
524 534 10 1.91% 16 33 49 50 $49.30
13-1121
[More_Info]
Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners
Coordinate activities of staff, convention personnel, or clients to make arrangements for group meetings, events, or conventions.
68 71 3 4.41% 2 6 8 8 $22.45
13-1131
[More_Info]
Fundraisers
Organize activities to raise funds or otherwise solicit and gather monetary donations or other gifts for an organization. May design and produce promotional materials. May also raise awareness of the organizations work, goals, and financial needs.
48 53 5 10.42% 2 4 6 6 $27.14
13-1141
[More_Info]
Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists
Conduct programs of compensation and benefits and job analysis for employer. May specialize in specific areas, such as position classification and pension programs.
121 124 3 2.48% 4 8 12 12 $36.01
13-1151
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Training and Development Specialists
Design and conduct training and development programs to improve individual and organizational performance. May analyze training needs.
707 709 2 0.28% 21 55 76 76 $22.17
13-1161
[More_Info]
Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists
Research market conditions in local, regional, or national areas, or gather information to determine potential sales of a product or service, or create a marketing campaign. May gather information on competitors, prices, sales, and methods of marketing and distribution.
137 146 9 6.57% 3 11 14 15 $31.58
13-1199
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Business Operations Specialists, All Other
All business operations specialists not listed separately.
3151 3147 -4 -0.13% 85 217 302 302 n/a
13-2000
Financial Specialists
4380 4487 107 2.44% 124 268 392 403 n/a
13-2011
[More_Info]
Accountants and Auditors
Examine, analyze, and interpret accounting records to prepare financial statements, give advice, or audit and evaluate statements prepared by others. Install or advise on systems of recording costs or other financial and budgetary data. Excludes Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents (13-2081).
1932 2053 121 6.26% 56 129 185 197 $38.71
13-2021
[More_Info]
Appraisers and Assessors of Real Estate
Appraise real property and estimate its fair value. May assess taxes in accordance with prescribed schedules.
185 183 -2 -1.08% 6 7 13 13 n/a
13-2031
[More_Info]
Budget Analysts
Examine budget estimates for completeness, accuracy, and conformance with procedures and regulations. Analyze budgeting and accounting reports.
266 263 -3 -1.13% 7 14 21 21 $39.91
13-2051
[More_Info]
Financial Analysts
Conduct quantitative analyses of information affecting investment programs of public or private institutions.
292 300 8 2.74% 6 19 25 26 n/a
13-2052
[More_Info]
Personal Financial Advisors
Advise clients on financial plans using knowledge of tax and investment strategies, securities, insurance, pension plans, and real estate. Duties include assessing clients' assets, liabilities, cash flow, insurance coverage, tax status, and financial objectives.
168 162 -6 -3.57% 4 9 13 12 $49.35
13-2053
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Insurance Underwriters
Review individual applications for insurance to evaluate degree of risk involved and determine acceptance of applications.
121 113 -8 -6.61% 3 7 10 9 $36.20
13-2072
[More_Info]
Loan Officers
Evaluate, authorize, or recommend approval of commercial, real estate, or credit loans. Advise borrowers on financial status and payment methods. Includes mortgage loan officers and agents, collection analysts, loan servicing officers, and loan underwriters.
473 456 -17 -3.59% 11 28 39 37 $37.47
13-2081
[More_Info]
Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents
Determine tax liability or collect taxes from individuals or business firms according to prescribed laws and regulations.
85 84 -1 -1.18% 3 4 7 7 $44.35
13-2082
[More_Info]
Tax Preparers
Prepare tax returns for individuals or small businesses. Excludes Accountants and Auditors (13-2011).
217 245 28 12.9% 11 15 26 29 $34.35
13-2099
[More_Info]
Financial Specialists, All Other
All financial specialists not listed separately.
577 564 -13 -2.25% 16 33 49 48 n/a

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Community and Social Services

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
21-1000
Counselors, Social Workers, and Other Community and Social Service Specialists
5749 6194 445 7.74% 195 422 617 662 n/a
21-1012
[More_Info]
Educational, Guidance, School, and Vocational Counselors
Counsel individuals and provide group educational and vocational guidance services.
505 499 -6 -1.19% 16 35 51 50 $32.82
21-1015
[More_Info]
Rehabilitation Counselors
Counsel individuals to maximize the independence and employability of persons coping with personal, social, and vocational difficulties that result from birth defects, illness, disease, accidents, or the stress of daily life. Coordinate activities for residents of care and treatment facilities. Assess client needs and design and implement rehabilitation programs that may include personal and vocational counseling, training, and job placement.
171 179 8 4.68% 6 12 18 19 $23.25
21-1018
Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors
675 733 58 8.59% 23 49 72 78 $29.80
21-1019
[More_Info]
Counselors, All Other
All counselors not listed separately.
321 350 29 9.03% 11 23 34 37 n/a
21-1021
[More_Info]
Child, Family, and School Social Workers
Provide social services and assistance to improve the social and psychological functioning of children and their families and to maximize the family well-being and the academic functioning of children. May assist parents, arrange adoptions, and find foster homes for abandoned or abused children. In schools, they address such problems as teenage pregnancy, misbehavior, and truancy. May also advise teachers.
956 1021 65 6.8% 29 67 96 102 $28.43
21-1022
[More_Info]
Healthcare Social Workers
Provide individuals, families, and groups with the psychosocial support needed to cope with chronic, acute, or terminal illnesses. Services include advising family care givers, providing patient education and counseling, and making referrals for other services. May also provide care and case management or interventions designed to promote health, prevent disease, and address barriers to access to healthcare.
206 222 16 7.77% 6 15 21 23 $30.00
21-1023
[More_Info]
Mental Health and Substance Abuse Social Workers
Assess and treat individuals with mental, emotional, or substance abuse problems, including abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and/or other drugs. Activities may include individual and group therapy, crisis intervention, case management, client advocacy, prevention, and education.
436 485 49 11.24% 14 31 45 50 $27.31
21-1029
[More_Info]
Social Workers, All Other
All social workers not listed separately.
368 393 25 6.79% 11 26 37 40 $35.82
21-1091
[More_Info]
Health Educators
Provide and manage health education programs that help individuals, families, and their communities maximize and maintain healthy lifestyles. Collect and analyze data to identify community needs prior to planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating programs designed to encourage healthy lifestyles, policies, and environments. May serve as resource to assist individuals, other health professionals, or the community, and may administer fiscal resources for health education programs. Excludes Community Health Workers (21-1094).
306 328 22 7.19% 12 24 36 38 $33.49
21-1092
[More_Info]
Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists
Provide social services to assist in rehabilitation of law offenders in custody or on probation or parole. Make recommendations for actions involving formulation of rehabilitation plan and treatment of offender, including conditional release and education and employment stipulations.
379 389 10 2.64% 8 24 32 33 n/a
21-1093
[More_Info]
Social and Human Service Assistants
Assist in providing client services in a wide variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, or social work, including support for families. May assist clients in identifying and obtaining available benefits and social and community services. May assist social workers with developing, organizing, and conducting programs to prevent and resolve problems relevant to substance abuse, human relationships, rehabilitation, or dependent care. Excludes Rehabilitation Counselors (21-1015), Psychiatric Technicians (29-2053), Personal Care Aides (39-9021), and Eligibility Interviewers, Government Programs (43-4061).
765 866 101 13.2% 33 64 97 107 $21.03
21-1094
[More_Info]
Community Health Workers
Assist individuals and communities to adopt healthy behaviors. Conduct outreach for medical personnel or health organizations to implement programs in the community that promote, maintain, and improve individual and community health. May provide information on available resources, provide social support and informal counseling, advocate for individuals and community health needs, and provide services such as first aid and blood pressure screening. May collect data to help identify community health needs. Excludes Health Educators (21-1091).
126 138 12 9.52% 5 10 15 16 $27.99
21-1099
[More_Info]
Community and Social Service Specialists, All Other
All community and social service specialists not listed separately.
530 585 55 10.38% 21 42 63 68 $19.40
21-2000
Religious Workers
424 429 5 1.18% 21 29 50 50 n/a
21-2021
[More_Info]
Directors, Religious Activities and Education
Plan, direct, or coordinate programs designed to promote the religious education or activities of a denominational group. May provide counseling and guidance relative to marital, health, financial, and religious problems.
218 218 0 0% 11 16 27 27 $29.15

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Computer and Mathematical

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
15-1100
Computer Occupations
4157 4434 277 6.66% 74 245 319 347 n/a
15-1111
[More_Info]
Computer and Information Research Scientists
Conduct research into fundamental computer and information science as theorists, designers, or inventors. Develop solutions to problems in the field of computer hardware and software.
31 35 4 12.9% 0 2 2 2 n/a
15-1121
[More_Info]
Computer Systems Analysts
Analyze science, engineering, business, and other data processing problems to implement and improve computer systems. Analyze user requirements, procedures, and problems to automate or improve existing systems and review computer system capabilities, workflow, and scheduling limitations. May analyze or recommend commercially available software.
570 626 56 9.82% 11 32 43 49 n/a
15-1122
[More_Info]
Information Security Analysts
Plan, implement, upgrade, or monitor security measures for the protection of computer networks and information. May ensure appropriate security controls are in place that will safeguard digital files and vital electronic infrastructure. May respond to computer security breaches and viruses. Excludes Computer Network Architects (15-1143).
63 71 8 12.7% 1 4 5 6 n/a
15-1131
[More_Info]
Computer Programmers
Create, modify, and test the code, forms, and script that allow computer applications to run. Work from specifications drawn up by software developers or other individuals. May assist software developers by analyzing user needs and designing software solutions. May develop and write computer programs to store, locate, and retrieve specific documents, data, and information.
557 570 13 2.33% 9 30 39 40 n/a
15-1132
[More_Info]
Software Developers, Applications
Develop, create, and modify general computer applications software or specialized utility programs. Analyze user needs and develop software solutions. Design software or customize software for client use with the aim of optimizing operational efficiency. May analyze and design databases within an application area, working individually or coordinating database development as part of a team. May supervise computer programmers.
179 204 25 13.97% 3 11 14 16 n/a
15-1133
[More_Info]
Software Developers, Systems Software
Research, design, develop, and test operating systems-level software, compilers, and network distribution software for medical, industrial, military, communications, aerospace, business, scientific, and general computing applications. Set operational specifications and formulate and analyze software requirements. May design embedded systems software. Apply principles and techniques of computer science, engineering, and mathematical analysis.
82 94 12 14.63% 1 5 6 7 n/a
15-1134
[More_Info]
Web Developers
Design, create, and modify Web sites. Analyze user needs to implement Web site content, graphics, performance, and capacity. May integrate Web sites with other computer applications. May convert written, graphic, audio, and video components to compatible Web formats by using software designed to facilitate the creation of Web and multimedia content. Excludes Multimedia Artists and Animators (27-1014).
73 74 1 1.37% 1 4 5 5 n/a
15-1141
[More_Info]
Database Administrators
Administer, test, and implement computer databases, applying knowledge of database management systems. Coordinate changes to computer databases. May plan, coordinate, and implement security measures to safeguard computer databases. Excludes Information Security Analysts (15-1122).
170 189 19 11.18% 3 9 12 14 n/a
15-1142
[More_Info]
Network and Computer Systems Administrators
Install, configure, and support an organizations local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), and Internet systems or a segment of a network system. Monitor network to ensure network availability to all system users and may perform necessary maintenance to support network availability. May monitor and test Web site performance to ensure Web sites operate correctly and without interruption. May assist in network modeling, analysis, planning, and coordination between network and data communications hardware and software. May supervise computer user support specialists and computer network support specialists. May administer network security measures. Excludes Information Security Analysts(15-1122), Computer User Support Specialists (15-1151), and Computer Network Support Specialists (15-1152).
752 785 33 4.39% 13 41 54 57 n/a
15-1143
[More_Info]
Computer Network Architects
Design and implement computer and information networks, such as local area networks (LAN), wide area networks (WAN), intranets, extranets, and other data communications networks. Perform network modeling, analysis, and planning. May also design network and computer security measures. May research and recommend network and data communications hardware and software. Excludes Information Security Analysts (15-1122), Network and Computer Systems Administrators (15-1142), and Computer Network Support Specialists (15-1152).
57 60 3 5.26% 1 3 4 4 n/a
15-1151
[More_Info]
Computer User Support Specialists
Provide technical assistance to computer users. Answer questions or resolve computer problems for clients in person, or via telephone or electronically. May provide assistance concerning the use of computer hardware and software, including printing, installation, word processing, electronic mail, and operating systems. Excludes Network and Computer Systems Administrators (15-1142).
982 1034 52 5.3% 19 64 83 88 n/a
15-1152
[More_Info]
Computer Network Support Specialists
Analyze, test, troubleshoot, and evaluate existing network systems, such as local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), and Internet systems or a segment of a network system. Perform network maintenance to ensure networks operate correctly with minimal interruption. Excludes Network and Computer Systems Administrators (15-1142) and Computer Network Architects (15-1143).
345 384 39 11.3% 7 23 30 34 n/a
15-1199
[More_Info]
Computer Occupations, All Other
All computer occupations not listed separately. Excludes Computer and Information Systems Managers (11-3021), Computer Hardware Engineers (17-2061), Electrical and Electronics Engineers (17-2070), Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary (25-1021), Multimedia Artists and Animators (27-1014), Graphic Designers (27-1024), Computer Operators (43-9011), and Computer, Automated Teller, and Office Machine Repairs (49-2011).
296 308 12 4.05% 5 17 22 23 n/a
15-2000
Mathematical Scientists
211 207 -4 -1.9% 5 10 15 15 n/a
15-2031
[More_Info]
Operations Research Analysts
Formulate and apply mathematical modeling and other optimizing methods to develop and interpret information that assists management with decision making, policy formulation, or other managerial functions. May collect and analyze data and develop decision support software, service, or products. May develop and supply optimal time, cost, or logistics networks for program evaluation, review, or implementation.
77 77 0 0% 2 3 5 5 $36.49
15-2041
[More_Info]
Statisticians
Develop or apply mathematical or statistical theory and methods to collect, organize, interpret, and summarize numerical data to provide usable information. May specialize in fields such as bio-statistics, agricultural statistics, business statistics, or economic statistics. Includes mathematical and survey statisticians. Excludes Survey Researchers (19-3022).
41 40 -1 -2.44% 1 2 3 3 $43.89
15-2090
Miscellaneous Mathematical Scientists
89 86 -3 -3.37% 2 5 7 7 n/a

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Construction and Extraction

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
47-1000
Supervisors, Construction and Extraction Workers
740 829 89 12.03% 23 58 81 90 n/a
47-1011
[More_Info]
Supervisors of Construction and Extraction Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of construction or extraction workers.
740 829 89 12.03% 23 58 81 90 $42.51
47-2000
Construction Trades Workers
13889 15090 1201 8.65% 464 1142 1606 1726 n/a
47-2011
[More_Info]
Boilermakers
Construct, assemble, maintain, and repair stationary steam boilers and boiler house auxiliaries. Align structures or plate sections to assemble boiler frame tanks or vats, following blueprints. Work involves use of hand and power tools, plumb bobs, levels, wedges, dogs, or turnbuckles. Assist in testing assembled vessels. Direct cleaning of boilers and boiler furnaces. Inspect and repair boiler fittings, such as safety valves, regulators, automatic-control mechanisms, water columns, and auxiliary machines.
64 72 8 12.5% 2 5 7 8 $38.99
47-2031
[More_Info]
Carpenters
Construct, erect, install, or repair structures and fixtures made of wood, such as concrete forms; building frameworks, including partitions, joists, studding, and rafters; and wood stairways, window and door frames, and hardwood floors. May also install cabinets, siding, drywall and batt or roll insulation. Includes brattice builders who build doors or brattices (ventilation walls or partitions) in underground passageways
2162 2467 305 14.11% 72 167 239 270 $31.75
47-2041
[More_Info]
Carpet Installers
Lay and install carpet from rolls or blocks on floors. Install padding and trim flooring materials. Excludes Floor Layers, Except Carpet, Wood, and Hard Tiles (47-2042).
49 52 3 6.12% 1 3 4 4 $21.98
47-2042
[More_Info]
Floor Layers, Except Carpet, Wood, and Hard Tiles
Apply blocks, strips, or sheets of shock-absorbing, sound-deadening, or decorative coverings to floors.
27 29 2 7.41% 1 2 3 3 n/a
47-2051
[More_Info]
Cement Masons and Concrete Finishers
Smooth and finish surfaces of poured concrete, such as floors, walks, sidewalks, roads, or curbs using a variety of hand and power tools. Align forms for sidewalks, curbs, or gutters; patch voids; and use saws to cut expansion joints. Installers of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units are classified in Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers (37- 3011).
160 173 13 8.13% 5 13 18 19 $26.51
47-2061
[More_Info]
Construction Laborers
Perform tasks involving physical labor at construction sites. May operate hand and power tools of all types: air hammers, earth tampers, cement mixers, small mechanical hoists, surveying and measuring equipment, and a variety of other equipment and instruments. May clean and prepare sites, dig trenches, set braces to support the sides of excavations, erect scaffolding, and clean up rubble, debris and other waste materials. May assist other craft workers. Construction laborers who primarily assist a particular craft worker are classified under Helpers, Construction Trades (47-3010). Excludes Hazardous Materials Removal Workers (47-4041).
3629 3960 331 9.12% 127 295 422 455 $25.50
47-2071
[More_Info]
Paving, Surfacing, and Tamping Equipment Operators
Operate equipment used for applying concrete, asphalt, or other materials to road beds, parking lots, or airport runways and taxiways, or equipment used for tamping gravel, dirt, or other materials. Includes concrete and asphalt paving machine operators, form tampers, tamping machine operators, and stone spreader operators.
97 102 5 5.15% 4 8 12 12 $22.71
47-2072
[More_Info]
Pile-Driver Operators
Operate pile drivers mounted on skids, barges, crawler treads, or locomotive cranes to drive pilings for retaining walls, bulkheads, and foundations of structures, such as buildings, bridges, and piers.
83 96 13 15.66% 3 7 10 11 n/a
47-2073
[More_Info]
Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators
Operate one or several types of power construction equipment, such as motor graders, bulldozers, scrapers, compressors, pumps, derricks, shovels, tractors, or front-end loaders to excavate, move, and grade earth, erect structures, or pour concrete or other hard surface pavement. May repair and maintain equipment in addition to other duties. Excludes Crane and Tower Operators (53-7021) and Extraction Workers (47-5000).
2788 2951 163 5.85% 97 233 330 346 $32.96
47-2081
[More_Info]
Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers
Apply plasterboard or other wallboard to ceilings or interior walls of buildings. Apply or mount acoustical tiles or blocks, strips, or sheets of shock-absorbing materials to ceilings and walls of buildings to reduce or reflect sound. Materials may be of decorative quality. Includes lathers who fasten wooden, metal, or rockboard lath to walls, ceilings or partitions of buildings to provide support base for plaster, fire-proofing, or acoustical material. Excludes Carpet Installers (47-2041), Carpenters (47-2031), and Tile and Marble Setters (47-2044).
94 101 7 7.45% 3 7 10 11 $24.90
47-2111
[More_Info]
Electricians
Install, maintain, and repair electrical wiring, equipment, and fixtures. Ensure that work is in accordance with relevant codes. May install or service street lights, intercom systems, or electrical control systems. Excludes Security and Fire Alarm Systems Installers (49-2098).
1769 1901 132 7.46% 56 156 212 225 $35.69
47-2121
[More_Info]
Glaziers
Install glass in windows, skylights, store fronts, and display cases, or on surfaces, such as building fronts, interior walls, ceilings, and tabletops.
128 135 7 5.47% 4 11 15 16 $27.97
47-2131
[More_Info]
Insulation Workers, Floor, Ceiling, and Wall
Line and cover structures with insulating materials. May work with batt, roll, or blown insulation materials.
109 119 10 9.17% 3 10 13 14 n/a
47-2132
[More_Info]
Insulation Workers, Mechanical
Apply insulating materials to pipes or ductwork, or other mechanical systems in order to help control and maintain temperature.
88 93 5 5.68% 2 8 10 10 $38.91
47-2141
[More_Info]
Painters, Construction and Maintenance
Paint walls, equipment, buildings, bridges, and other structural surfaces, using brushes, rollers, and spray guns. May remove old paint to prepare surface prior to painting. May mix colors or oils to obtain desired color or consistency. Excludes Paperhangers (47-2142).
460 495 35 7.61% 17 32 49 52 $29.16
47-2151
[More_Info]
Pipelayers
Lay pipe for storm or sanitation sewers, drains, and water mains. Perform any combination of the following tasks: grade trenches or culverts, position pipe, or seal joints. Excludes Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers (51-4121).
27 29 2 7.41% 1 2 3 3 n/a
47-2152
[More_Info]
Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters
Assemble, install, alter, and repair pipelines or pipe systems that carry water, steam, air, or other liquids or gases. May install heating and cooling equipment and mechanical control systems. Includes sprinklerfitters.
1307 1411 104 7.96% 40 111 151 161 $42.38
47-2181
[More_Info]
Roofers
Cover roofs of structures with shingles, slate, asphalt, aluminum, wood, or related materials. May spray roofs, sidings, and walls with material to bind, seal, insulate, or soundproof sections of structures.
219 234 15 6.85% 6 18 24 26 $27.71
47-2211
[More_Info]
Sheet Metal Workers
Fabricate, assemble, install, and repair sheet metal products and equipment, such as ducts, control boxes, drainpipes, and furnace casings. Work may involve any of the following: setting up and operating fabricating machines to cut, bend, and straighten sheet metal; shaping metal over anvils, blocks, or forms using hammer; operating soldering and welding equipment to join sheet metal parts; or inspecting, assembling, and smoothing seams and joints of burred surfaces. Includes sheet metal duct installers who install prefabricated sheet metal ducts used for heating, air conditioning, or other purposes.
353 370 17 4.82% 11 28 39 41 $38.73
47-2221
[More_Info]
Structural Iron and Steel Workers
Raise, place, and unite iron or steel girders, columns, and other structural members to form completed structures or structural frameworks. May erect metal storage tanks and assemble prefabricated metal buildings. Excludes Reinforcing Iron and Rebar Workers (47-2171).
157 171 14 8.92% 5 15 20 21 $36.93
47-3000
Helpers, Construction Trades
1284 1388 104 8.1% 44 137 181 191 n/a
47-3011
[More_Info]
Helpers--Brickmasons, Blockmasons, Stonemasons, and Tile and Marble Setters
Help brickmasons, blockmasons, stonemasons, or tile and marble setters by performing duties requiring less skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Construction laborers who do not primarily assist brickmasons, blockmasons, and stonemasons or tile and marble setters are classified under Construction Laborers (47-2061). Apprentice workers are classified with the appropriate skilled construction trade occupation (47-2011 through 47-2231).
38 40 2 5.26% 1 4 5 5 n/a
47-3012
[More_Info]
Helpers--Carpenters
Help carpenters by performing duties requiring less skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Construction laborers who do not primarily assist carpenters are classified under Construction Laborers (47-2061). Apprentice workers are classified with the appropriate skilled construction trade occupation (47-2011 through 47-2231).
323 355 32 9.91% 11 35 46 49 $18.31
47-3013
[More_Info]
Helpers--Electricians
Help electricians by performing duties requiring less skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Construction laborers who do not primarily assist electricians are classified under Construction Laborers (47-2061). Apprentice workers are classified with the appropriate skilled construction trade occupation (47-2011 through 47-2231).
169 182 13 7.69% 6 18 24 25 n/a
47-3014
[More_Info]
Helpers--Painters, Paperhangers, Plasterers, and Stucco Masons
Help painters, paperhangers, plasterers, or stucco masons by performing duties requiring less skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Construction laborers who do not primarily assist painters, paperhangers, plasterers, or stucco masons are classified under Construction Laborers (47-2061). Apprentice workers are classified with the appropriate skilled construction trade occupation (47-2011 through 47-2231).
68 72 4 5.88% 2 7 9 9 n/a
47-3015
[More_Info]
Helpers--Pipelayers, Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters
Help plumbers, pipefitters, steamfitters, or pipelayers by performing duties requiring less skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Construction laborers who do not primarily assist plumbers, pipefitters, steamfitters, or pipelayers are classified under Construction Laborers (47-2061). Apprentice workers are classified with the appropriate skilled construction trade occupation (47-2011 through 47-2231).
150 164 14 9.33% 5 16 21 22 $20.93
47-3016
[More_Info]
Helpers--Roofers
Help roofers by performing duties requiring less skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Construction laborers who do not primarily assist roofers are classified under Construction Laborers (47-2061). Apprentice workers are classified with the appropriate skilled construction trade occupation (47-2011 through 47-2231).
47 50 3 6.38% 2 5 7 7 $20.51
47-3019
[More_Info]
Helpers, Construction Trades, All Other
All construction trades helpers not listed separately.
489 525 36 7.36% 17 52 69 73 $23.45
47-4000
Other Construction and Related Workers
1521 1623 102 6.71% 64 127 191 201 n/a
47-4011
[More_Info]
Construction and Building Inspectors
Inspect structures using engineering skills to determine structural soundness and compliance with specifications, building codes, and other regulations. Inspections may be general in nature or may be limited to a specific area, such as electrical systems or plumbing.
276 305 29 10.51% 16 20 36 39 $43.39
47-4031
[More_Info]
Fence Erectors
Erect and repair fences and fence gates, using hand and power tools.
55 57 2 3.64% 2 4 6 6 n/a
47-4041
[More_Info]
Hazardous Materials Removal Workers
Identify, remove, pack, transport, or dispose of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead-based paint, waste oil, fuel, transmission fluid, radioactive materials, or contaminated soil. Specialized training and certification in hazardous materials handling or a confined entry permit are generally required. May operate earth-moving equipment or trucks.
412 451 39 9.47% 18 36 54 58 $28.64
47-4051
[More_Info]
Highway Maintenance Workers
Maintain highways, municipal and rural roads, airport runways, and rights-of-way. Duties include patching broken or eroded pavement, repairing guard rails, highway markers, and snow fences. May also mow or clear brush from along road or plow snow from roadway. Excludes Tree Trimmers and Pruners (37-3013).
136 136 0 0% 5 10 15 15 $28.06
47-4061
[More_Info]
Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators
Lay, repair, and maintain track for standard or narrow-gauge railroad equipment used in regular railroad service or in plant yards, quarries, sand and gravel pits, and mines. Includes ballast cleaning machine operators and railroad bed tamping machine operators.
73 74 1 1.37% 3 5 8 8 n/a
47-4071
[More_Info]
Septic Tank Servicers and Sewer Pipe Cleaners
Clean and repair septic tanks, sewer lines, or drains. May patch walls and partitions of tank, replace damaged drain tile, or repair breaks in underground piping.
88 93 5 5.68% 3 8 11 12 n/a
47-4090
Miscellaneous Construction and Related Workers
465 489 24 5.16% 16 43 59 61 $23.07
47-5000
Extraction Workers
3051 3588 537 17.6% 103 341 444 498 n/a
47-5011
[More_Info]
Derrick Operators, Oil and Gas
Rig derrick equipment and operate pumps to circulate mud through drill hole.
47 62 15 31.91% 2 6 8 10 $33.50
47-5012
[More_Info]
Rotary Drill Operators, Oil and Gas
Set up or operate a variety of drills to remove underground oil and gas, or remove core samples for testing during oil and gas exploration. Excludes Earth Drillers, Except Oil and Gas (47-5021).
163 192 29 17.79% 5 20 25 28 $38.38
47-5013
[More_Info]
Service Unit Operators, Oil, Gas, and Mining
Operate equipment to increase oil flow from producing wells or to remove stuck pipe, casing, tools, or other obstructions from drilling wells. May also perform similar services in mining exploration operations. Includes fishing-tool technicians.
993 1074 81 8.16% 29 117 146 154 n/a
47-5021
[More_Info]
Earth Drillers, Except Oil and Gas
Operate a variety of drills such as rotary, churn, and pneumatic to tap sub-surface water and salt deposits, to remove core samples during mineral exploration or soil testing, and to facilitate the use of explosives in mining or construction. May use explosives. Includes horizontal and earth boring machine operators.
163 193 30 18.4% 6 17 23 26 n/a
47-5031
[More_Info]
Explosives Workers, Ordnance Handling Experts, and Blasters
Place and detonate explosives to demolish structures or to loosen, remove, or displace earth, rock, or other materials. May perform specialized handling, storage, and accounting procedures. Includes seismograph shooters. Excludes Earth Drillers, Except Oil and Gas (47-5021) who may also work with explosives.
45 53 8 17.78% 2 4 6 7 n/a
47-5042
[More_Info]
Mine Cutting and Channeling Machine Operators
Operate machinery such as longwall shears, plows, and cutting machines to cut or channel along the face or seams of coal mines, stone quarries, or other mining surfaces to facilitate blasting, separating, or removing minerals or materials from mines or from the Earth's surface. Includes shale planers.
32 40 8 25% 1 3 4 5 n/a
47-5049
[More_Info]
Mining Machine Operators, All Other
All mining machine operators not listed separately.
585 750 165 28.21% 23 60 83 100 n/a
47-5071
[More_Info]
Roustabouts, Oil and Gas
Assemble or repair oil field equipment using hand and power tools. Perform other tasks as needed.
464 528 64 13.79% 14 51 65 71 $24.12
47-5081
[More_Info]
Helpers--Extraction Workers
Help extraction craft workers, such as earth drillers, blasters and explosives workers, derrick operators, and mining machine operators, by performing duties requiring less skill. Duties include supplying equipment or cleaning work area. Apprentice workers are classified with the appropriate skilled construction trade occupation (47-2011 through 47-2231).
133 166 33 24.81% 5 15 20 23 $23.40
47-5099
[More_Info]
Extraction Workers, All Other
All extraction workers not listed separately.
385 477 92 23.9% 14 43 57 66 n/a

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Education, Training, and Library

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
25-1000
Postsecondary Teachers
2490 2394 -96 -3.86% 88 112 200 190 n/a
25-1011
[More_Info]
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
397 380 -17 -4.28% 14 18 32 30 n/a
25-1021
[More_Info]
Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in computer science. May specialize in a field of computer science, such as the design and function of computers or operations and research analysis. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
60 58 -2 -3.33% 2 3 5 5 n/a
25-1022
[More_Info]
Mathematical Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses pertaining to mathematical concepts, statistics, and actuarial science and to the application of original and standardized mathematical techniques in solving specific problems and situations. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
145 139 -6 -4.14% 5 7 12 11 n/a
25-1032
[More_Info]
Engineering Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses pertaining to the application of physical laws and principles of engineering for the development of machines, materials, instruments, processes, and services. Includes teachers of subjects such as chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, mechanical, mineral, and petroleum engineering. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research. Excludes Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary (25-1021).
92 88 -4 -4.35% 3 4 7 7 n/a
25-1041
[More_Info]
Agricultural Sciences Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in the agricultural sciences. Includes teachers of agronomy, dairy sciences, fisheries management, horticultural sciences, poultry sciences, range management, and agricultural soil conservation. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research. Excludes Forestry and Conservation Science Teachers, Postsecondary (25-1043).
40 38 -2 -5% 1 2 3 3 n/a
25-1042
[More_Info]
Biological Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in biological sciences. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
115 110 -5 -4.35% 4 5 9 8 n/a
25-1051
[More_Info]
Atmospheric, Earth, Marine, and Space Sciences Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in the physical sciences, except chemistry and physics. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching, and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
52 50 -2 -3.85% 2 2 4 4 n/a
25-1053
[More_Info]
Environmental Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in environmental science. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
32 30 -2 -6.25% 1 1 2 2 n/a
25-1054
[More_Info]
Physics Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses pertaining to the laws of matter and energy. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
26 25 -1 -3.85% 1 1 2 2 n/a
25-1061
[More_Info]
Anthropology and Archeology Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in anthropology or archeology. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
28 27 -1 -3.57% 1 1 2 2 n/a
25-1065
[More_Info]
Political Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in political science, international affairs, and international relations. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
63 61 -2 -3.17% 2 3 5 5 n/a
25-1066
[More_Info]
Psychology Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in psychology, such as child, clinical, and developmental psychology, and psychological counseling. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
47 45 -2 -4.26% 2 2 4 4 n/a
25-1071
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Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in health specialties, in fields such as dentistry, laboratory technology, medicine, pharmacy, public health, therapy, and veterinary medicine. Excludes Nursing Instructors and Teachers, Postsecondary (25-1072) and Biological Science Teachers, Postsecondary (25-1042) who teach medical science.
60 59 -1 -1.67% 2 3 5 5 n/a
25-1072
[More_Info]
Nursing Instructors and Teachers, Postsecondary
Demonstrate and teach patient care in classroom and clinical units to nursing students. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
86 83 -3 -3.49% 3 4 7 7 n/a
25-1081
[More_Info]
Education Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses pertaining to education, such as counseling, curriculum, guidance, instruction, teacher education, and teaching English as a second language. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
114 109 -5 -4.39% 4 5 9 8 n/a
25-1082
[More_Info]
Library Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in library science. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
38 36 -2 -5.26% 1 2 3 3 n/a
25-1121
[More_Info]
Art, Drama, and Music Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in drama, music, and the arts including fine and applied art, such as painting and sculpture, or design and crafts. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
64 62 -2 -3.13% 2 3 5 5 n/a
25-1122
[More_Info]
Communications Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in communications, such as organizational communications, public relations, radio/television broadcasting, and journalism. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
28 27 -1 -3.57% 1 1 2 2 n/a
25-1123
[More_Info]
English Language and Literature Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in English language and literature, including linguistics and comparative literature. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
77 74 -3 -3.9% 3 3 6 6 n/a
25-1194
[More_Info]
Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach or instruct vocational or occupational subjects at the postsecondary level (but at less than the baccalaureate) to students who have graduated or left high school. Includes correspondence school instructors; industrial, commercial, and government training instructors; and adult education teachers and instructors who prepare persons to operate industrial machinery and equipment and transportation and communications equipment. Teaching may take place in public or private schools whose primary business is education or in a school associated with an organization whose primary business is other than education.
214 210 -4 -1.87% 8 10 18 18 $36.24
25-1199
[More_Info]
Postsecondary Teachers, All Other
All postsecondary teachers not listed separately.
450 431 -19 -4.22% 16 20 36 34 n/a
25-2000
Primary, Secondary, and Special Education School Teachers
6799 6801 2 0.03% 217 307 524 524 n/a
25-2011
[More_Info]
Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education
Instruct preschool-aged children in activities designed to promote social, physical, and intellectual growth needed for primary school in preschool, day care center, or other child development facility. Substitute teachers are included in Teachers and Instructors, All Other (25-3099). May be required to hold State certification. Excludes Childcare Workers (39-9011) and Special Education Teachers (25-2050).
702 750 48 6.84% 29 44 73 78 $17.76
25-2012
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Kindergarten Teachers, Except Special Education
Teach elemental natural and social science, personal hygiene, music, art, and literature to kindergarten students. Promote physical, mental, and social development. May be required to hold State certification. Substitute teachers are included in Teachers and Instructors, All Other (25-3099). Excludes Special Education Teachers (25-2050).
334 332 -2 -0.6% 13 20 33 33 n/a
25-2021
[More_Info]
Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education
Teach students basic academic, social, and other formative skills in public or private schools at the elementary level. Substitute teachers are included in Teachers and Instructors, All Other (25-3099). Excludes Special Education Teachers (25-2050).
2283 2264 -19 -0.83% 71 97 168 166 n/a
25-2022
[More_Info]
Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects in public or private schools at the middle, intermediate, or junior high level, which falls between elementary and senior high school as defined by applicable laws and regulations. Substitute teachers are included in Teachers and Instructors, All Other (25-3099). Excludes Career/Technical Education Teachers, Middle School (25-2023) and Special Education Teachers (25-2050).
593 589 -4 -0.67% 18 25 43 43 n/a
25-2031
[More_Info]
Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects, such as English, mathematics, or social studies at the secondary level in public or private schools. May be designated according to subject matter specialty. Substitute teachers are included in Teachers and Instructors, All Other (25-3099). Excludes Career/Technical Education Teachers, Secondary School (25-2032) and Special Education Teachers (25-2050).
1695 1680 -15 -0.89% 47 71 118 116 n/a
25-2032
[More_Info]
Career/Technical Education Teachers, Secondary School
Teach occupational, career and technical, or vocational subjects at the secondary school level in public or private schools. Substitute teachers are included in Teachers and Instructors, All Other (25-3099). Excludes Special Education Teachers, Secondary School (25-2054).
107 106 -1 -0.93% 3 5 8 8 n/a
25-2051
[More_Info]
Special Education Teachers, Preschool
Teach preschool school subjects to educationally and physically handicapped students. Includes teachers who specialize and work with audibly and visually handicapped students and those who teach basic academic and life processes skills to the mentally impaired. Substitute teachers are included in Teachers and Instructors, All Other (25-3099).
136 138 2 1.47% 5 6 11 11 n/a
25-2052
[More_Info]
Special Education Teachers, Kindergarten and Elementary School
Teach elementary school subjects to educationally and physically handicapped students. Includes teachers who specialize and work with audibly and visually handicapped students and those who teach basic academic and life processes skills to the mentally impaired. Substitute teachers are included in Teachers and Instructors, All Other (25-3099).
296 294 -2 -0.68% 10 12 22 22 n/a
25-2053
[More_Info]
Special Education Teachers, Middle School
Teach middle school subjects to educationally and physically handicapped students. Includes teachers who specialize and work with audibly and visually handicapped students and those who teach basic academic and life processes skills to the mentally impaired. Substitute teachers are included in Teachers and Instructors, All Other (25-3099).
88 87 -1 -1.14% 3 4 7 7 n/a
25-2054
[More_Info]
Special Education Teachers, Secondary School
Teach secondary school subjects to educationally and physically handicapped students. Includes teachers who specialize and work with audibly and visually handicapped students and those who teach basic academic and life processes skills to the mentally impaired. Substitute teachers are included in Teachers and Instructors, All Other (25-3099).
187 186 -1 -0.53% 6 8 14 14 n/a
25-2059
[More_Info]
Special Education Teachers, All Other
All special education teachers not listed separately.
368 365 -3 -0.82% 12 15 27 27 n/a
25-3000
Other Teachers and Instructors
3853 3837 -16 -0.42% 222 217 439 437 n/a
25-3011
[More_Info]
Adult Basic and Secondary Education and Literacy Teachers and Instructors
Teach or instruct out-of-school youths and adults in remedial education classes, preparatory classes for the General Educational Development test, literacy, or English as a Second Language. Teaching may or may not take place in a traditional educational institution.
84 86 2 2.38% 5 5 10 10 n/a
25-3021
[More_Info]
Self-Enrichment Education Teachers
Teach or instruct courses other than those that normally lead to an occupational objective or degree. Courses may include self-improvement, nonvocational, and nonacademic subjects. Teaching may or may not take place in a traditional educational institution. Excludes Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors (39-9031). Flight instructors are included with Aircraft Pilots and Flight Engineers (53-2010).
115 118 3 2.61% 7 7 14 14 $26.77
25-4000
Librarians, Curators, and Archivists
523 513 -10 -1.91% 31 28 59 58 n/a
25-4012
[More_Info]
Curators
Administer collections, such as artwork, collectibles, historic items, or scientific specimens of museums or other institutions. May conduct instructional, research, or public service activities of institution.
55 53 -2 -3.64% 2 3 5 5 $35.50
25-4013
[More_Info]
Museum Technicians and Conservators
Restore, maintain, or prepare objects in museum collections for storage, research, or exhibit. May work with specimens such as fossils, skeletal parts, or botanicals; or artifacts, textiles, or art. May identify and record objects or install and arrange them in exhibits. Includes book or document conservators.
61 60 -1 -1.64% 3 4 7 7 $22.92
25-4021
[More_Info]
Librarians
Administer libraries and perform related library services. Work in a variety of settings, including public libraries, educational institutions, museums, corporations, government agencies, law firms, non-profit organizations, and healthcare providers. Tasks may include selecting, acquiring, cataloguing, classifying, circulating, and maintaining library materials; and furnishing reference, bibliographical, and readers' advisory services. May perform in-depth, strategic research, and synthesize, analyze, edit, and filter information. May set up or work with databases and information systems to catalogue and access information.
258 253 -5 -1.94% 14 12 26 26 n/a
25-4031
[More_Info]
Library Technicians
Assist librarians by helping readers in the use of library catalogs, databases, and indexes to locate books and other materials; and by answering questions that require only brief consultation of standard reference. Compile records; sort and shelve books or other media; remove or repair damaged books or other media; register patrons; and check materials in and out of the circulation process. Replace materials in shelving area (stacks) or files. Includes bookmobile drivers who assist with providing services in mobile libraries.
127 123 -4 -3.15% 11 8 19 19 $22.78
25-9000
Other Education, Training, and Library Occupations
5550 5533 -17 -0.31% 280 289 569 567 n/a
25-9031
[More_Info]
Instructional Coordinators
Develop instructional material, coordinate educational content, and incorporate current technology in specialized fields that provide guidelines to educators and instructors for developing curricula and conducting courses. Includes educational consultants and specialists, and instructional material directors.
295 298 3 1.02% 12 15 27 27 $35.44
25-9041
[More_Info]
Teacher Assistants
Perform duties that are instructional in nature or deliver direct services to students or parents. Serve in a position for which a teacher has ultimate responsibility for the design and implementation of educational programs and services. Excludes Graduate Teaching Assistants (25-1191).
4362 4345 -17 -0.39% 231 228 459 457 n/a
25-9099
[More_Info]
Education, Training, and Library Workers, All Other
All education, training, and library workers not listed separately.
875 871 -4 -0.46% 36 45 81 81 $23.25

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Farming, Fishing, and Forestry

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
45-1000
Supervisors, Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Workers
103 110 7 6.8% 4 12 16 17 n/a
45-1011
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of agricultural, forestry, aquacultural, and related workers. Excludes First-Line Supervisors of Landscaping, Lawn Service, and Groundskeeping Workers (37-1012).
103 110 7 6.8% 4 12 16 17 $23.99
45-2000
Agricultural Workers
847 1294 447 52.77% 42 132 174 219 n/a
45-2011
[More_Info]
Agricultural Inspectors
Inspect agricultural commodities, processing equipment, and facilities, and fish and logging operations, to ensure compliance with regulations and laws governing health, quality, and safety.
25 26 1 4% 1 3 4 4 n/a
45-2092
[More_Info]
Farmworkers and Laborers, Crop, Nursery, and Greenhouse
Manually plant, cultivate, and harvest vegetables, fruits, nuts, horticultural specialties, and field crops. Use hand tools, such as shovels, trowels, hoes, tampers, pruning hooks, shears, and knives. Duties may include tilling soil and applying fertilizers; transplanting, weeding, thinning, or pruning crops; applying pesticides; or cleaning, grading, sorting, packing, and loading harvested products. May construct trellises, repair fences and farm buildings, or participate in irrigation activities. Excludes Graders and Sorters, Agricultural Products (45-2041) and Forest, Conservation, and Logging Workers (45-4011 through 45-4029).
563 972 409 72.65% 30 95 125 166 $15.72
45-2093
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Farmworkers, Farm, Ranch, and Aquacultural Animals
Attend to live farm, ranch, or aquacultural animals that may include cattle, sheep, swine, goats, horses and other equines, poultry, finfish, shellfish, and bees. Attend to animals produced for animal products, such as meat, fur, skins, feathers, eggs, milk, and honey. Duties may include feeding, watering, herding, grazing, castrating, branding, de-beaking, weighing, catching, and loading animals. May maintain records on animals; examine animals to detect diseases and injuries; assist in birth deliveries; and administer medications, vaccinations, or insecticides as appropriate. May clean and maintain animal housing areas. Includes workers who shear wool from sheep, and collect eggs in hatcheries.
104 115 11 10.58% 4 14 18 19 $23.66
45-2099
[More_Info]
Agricultural Workers, All Other
All agricultural workers not listed separately.
130 151 21 16.15% 6 17 23 25 n/a
45-3000
Fishing and Hunting Workers
553 596 43 7.78% 21 71 92 96 n/a
45-3011
[More_Info]
Fishers and Related Fishing Workers
Use nets, fishing rods, traps, or other equipment to catch and gather fish or other aquatic animals from rivers, lakes, or oceans, for human consumption or other uses. May haul game onto ship. Aquacultural laborers who work on fish farms are included in Farmworkers, Farm, Ranch, and Aquacultural Animals (45-2093).
530 571 41 7.74% 20 68 88 92 n/a
45-4000
Forest, Conservation, and Logging Workers
195 185 -10 -5.13% 7 24 31 30 n/a
45-4011
[More_Info]
Forest and Conservation Workers
Under supervision, perform manual labor necessary to develop, maintain, or protect areas such as forests, forested areas, woodlands, wetlands, and rangelands through such activities as raising and transporting seedlings; combating insects, pests, and diseases harmful to plant life; and building structures to control water, erosion, and leaching of soil. Includes forester aides, seedling pullers, and tree planters.
42 48 6 14.29% 2 6 8 9 n/a
45-4021
[More_Info]
Fallers
Use axes or chainsaws to fell trees using knowledge of tree characteristics and cutting techniques to control direction of fall and minimize tree damage.
60 52 -8 -13.33% 2 7 9 8 n/a
45-4022
[More_Info]
Logging Equipment Operators
Drive logging tractor or wheeled vehicle equipped with one or more accessories, such as bulldozer blade, frontal shear, grapple, logging arch, cable winches, hoisting rack, or crane boom, to fell tree; to skid, load, unload, or stack logs; or to pull stumps or clear brush. Logging truck drivers are included in Heavy and Tractor Trailer Truck Drivers (53-3032).
62 55 -7 -11.29% 2 7 9 8 $32.52

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Food Preparation and Serving Related

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
35-1000
Supervisors, Food Preparation and Serving Workers
1084 1188 104 9.59% 43 120 163 173 n/a
35-1011
[More_Info]
Chefs and Head Cooks
Direct and may participate in the preparation, seasoning, and cooking of salads, soups, fish, meats, vegetables, desserts, or other foods. May plan and price menu items, order supplies, and keep records and accounts.
455 506 51 11.21% 14 48 62 67 $25.29
35-1012
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Food Preparation and Serving Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of workers engaged in preparing and serving food.
629 682 53 8.43% 29 72 101 106 $19.07
35-2000
Cooks and Food Preparation Workers
8339 9237 898 10.77% 550 822 1372 1462 n/a
35-2011
[More_Info]
Cooks, Fast Food
Prepare and cook food in a fast food restaurant with a limited menu. Duties of these cooks are limited to preparation of a few basic items and normally involve operating large-volume single-purpose cooking equipment.
242 271 29 11.98% 14 23 37 40 $13.32
35-2012
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Cooks, Institution and Cafeteria
Prepare and cook large quantities of food for institutions, such as schools, hospitals, or cafeterias.
646 694 48 7.43% 36 59 95 100 $19.71
35-2014
[More_Info]
Cooks, Restaurant
Prepare, season, and cook dishes such as soups, meats, vegetables, or desserts in restaurants. May order supplies, keep records and accounts, price items on menu, or plan menu.
2547 2867 320 12.56% 144 239 383 415 $14.88
35-2015
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Cooks, Short Order
Prepare and cook to order a variety of foods that require only a short preparation time. May take orders from customers and serve patrons at counters or tables. Excludes Fast Food Cooks (35-2011).
440 486 46 10.45% 25 41 66 71 $16.26
35-2019
[More_Info]
Cooks, All Other
All cooks not listed separately.
634 683 49 7.73% 35 58 93 98 $16.90
35-2021
[More_Info]
Food Preparation Workers
Perform a variety of food preparation duties other than cooking, such as preparing cold foods and shellfish, slicing meat, and brewing coffee or tea.
3818 4224 406 10.63% 295 401 696 737 $15.38
35-3000
Food and Beverage Serving Workers
13243 14554 1311 9.9% 1075 1543 2618 2749 n/a
35-3011
[More_Info]
Bartenders
Mix and serve drinks to patrons, directly or through waitstaff.
1590 1608 18 1.13% 75 206 281 283 $13.98
35-3021
[More_Info]
Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food
Perform duties which combine preparing and serving food and nonalcoholic beverages.
4674 5172 498 10.65% 393 484 877 927 n/a
35-3022
[More_Info]
Counter Attendants, Cafeteria, Food Concession, and Coffee Shop
Serve food to diners at counter or from a steam table. Counter attendants who also wait tables are included in Waiters and Waitresses (35-3031).
2051 2265 214 10.43% 243 225 468 489 n/a
35-3031
[More_Info]
Waiters and Waitresses
Take orders and serve food and beverages to patrons at tables in dining establishment. Excludes Counter Attendants, Cafeteria, Food Concession, and Coffee Shop (35-3022).
4663 5215 552 11.84% 343 605 948 1003 $12.74
35-3041
[More_Info]
Food Servers, Nonrestaurant
Serve food to individuals outside of a restaurant environment, such as in hotel rooms, hospital rooms, residential care facilities, or cars. Excludes Door-to-Door Sales Workers, News and Street Vendors, and Related Workers (41-9091) and Counter Attendants, Cafeteria, Food Concession, and Coffee Shop (35-3022).
265 294 29 10.94% 21 23 44 47 $14.30
35-9000
Other Food Preparation and Serving Related Workers
4277 4770 493 11.53% 391 424 815 864 n/a
35-9011
[More_Info]
Dining Room and Cafeteria Attendants and Bartender Helpers
Facilitate food service. Clean tables, remove dirty dishes, replace soiled table linens; set tables; replenish supply of clean linens, silverware, glassware, and dishes; supply service bar with food; and serve items such as water, condiments, and coffee to patrons.
887 981 94 10.6% 77 83 160 169 $13.90
35-9021
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Dishwashers
Clean dishes, kitchen, food preparation equipment, or utensils.
1535 1724 189 12.31% 121 137 258 277 $12.47
35-9031
[More_Info]
Hosts and Hostesses, Restaurant, Lounge, and Coffee Shop
Welcome patrons, seat them at tables or in lounge, and help ensure quality of facilities and service.
994 1113 119 11.97% 118 124 242 254 $12.88
35-9099
[More_Info]
Food Preparation and Serving Related Workers, All Other
All food preparation and serving related workers not listed separately.
861 952 91 10.57% 75 80 155 164 $16.04

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Healthcare Practitioner and Technical

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
29-1000
Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners
10826 11632 806 7.45% 270 277 547 628 n/a
29-1011
[More_Info]
Chiropractors
Assess, treat, and care for patients by manipulation of spine and musculoskeletal system. May provide spinal adjustment or address sacral or pelvic misalignment.
88 96 8 9.09% 2 1 3 4 $43.42
29-1021
[More_Info]
Dentists, General
Examine, diagnose, and treat diseases, injuries, and malformations of teeth and gums. May treat diseases of nerve, pulp, and other dental tissues affecting oral hygiene and retention of teeth. May fit dental appliances or provide preventive care. Excludes Prosthodontists (29-1024), Orthodontists (29-1023), Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (29-1022) and Dentists, All Other Specialists (29-1029).
226 248 22 9.73% 5 2 7 9 $116.75
29-1029
[More_Info]
Dentists, All Other Specialists
All dentists not listed separately.
40 43 3 7.5% 1 0 1 1 n/a
29-1031
[More_Info]
Dietitians and Nutritionists
Plan and conduct food service or nutritional programs to assist in the promotion of health and control of disease. May supervise activities of a department providing quantity food services, counsel individuals, or conduct nutritional research.
166 174 8 4.82% 6 5 11 12 $37.67
29-1041
[More_Info]
Optometrists
Diagnose, manage, and treat conditions and diseases of the human eye and visual system. Examine eyes and visual system, diagnose problems or impairments, prescribe corrective lenses, and provide treatment. May prescribe therapeutic drugs to treat specific eye conditions. Ophthalmologists are included in Physicians and Surgeons, All Other (29-1069).
62 67 5 8.06% 1 1 2 2 $70.52
29-1051
[More_Info]
Pharmacists
Dispense drugs prescribed by physicians and other health practitioners and provide information to patients about medications and their use. May advise physicians and other health practitioners on the selection, dosage, interactions, and side effects of medications.
346 360 14 4.05% 8 8 16 17 $70.69
29-1061
[More_Info]
Anesthesiologists
Physicians who administer anesthetics prior to, during, or after surgery, or other medical procedures.
30 33 3 10% 1 0 1 1 n/a
29-1062
[More_Info]
Family and General Practitioners
Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases and injuries that commonly occur in the general population. May refer patients to specialists when needed for further diagnosis or treatment.
385 415 30 7.79% 7 5 12 15 n/a
29-1063
[More_Info]
Internists, General
Physicians who diagnose and provide non-surgical treatment of diseases and injuries of internal organ systems. Provide care mainly for adults who have a wide range of problems associated with the internal organs. Subspecialists, such as cardiologists and gastroenterologists, are included in Physicians and Surgeons, All Other (29-1069).
106 114 8 7.55% 2 1 3 4 n/a
29-1064
[More_Info]
Obstetricians and Gynecologists
Physicians who provide medical care related to pregnancy or childbirth and those who diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases of women, particularly those affecting the reproductive system. May also provide general medical care to women.
43 46 3 6.98% 1 1 2 2 n/a
29-1065
[More_Info]
Pediatricians, General
Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent children's diseases and injuries.
64 69 5 7.81% 1 1 2 2 n/a
29-1066
[More_Info]
Psychiatrists
Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent disorders of the mind.
66 69 3 4.55% 1 1 2 2 n/a
29-1067
[More_Info]
Surgeons
Physicians who treat diseases, injuries, and deformities by invasive, minimally-invasive, or non-invasive surgical methods, such as using instruments, appliances, or by manual manipulation. Excludes Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (29-1022).
27 28 1 3.7% 0 0 0 0 n/a
29-1069
[More_Info]
Physicians and Surgeons, All Other
All physicians and surgeons not listed separately.
439 475 36 8.2% 7 6 13 17 n/a
29-1071
[More_Info]
Physician Assistants
Provide healthcare services typically performed by a physician, under the supervision of a physician. Conduct complete physicals, provide treatment, and counsel patients. May, in some cases, prescribe medication. Must graduate from an accredited educational program for physician assistants. Excludes Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics (29-2041), Medical Assistants (31-9092), Registered Nurses (29-1141), Nurse Anesthetists (29-1151), Nurse Midwives (29-1161), and Nurse Practitioners (29-1171).
437 473 36 8.24% 7 19 26 30 $72.32
29-1122
[More_Info]
Occupational Therapists
Assess, plan, organize, and participate in rehabilitative programs that help build or restore vocational, homemaking, and daily living skills, as well as general independence, to persons with disabilities or developmental delays.
224 240 16 7.14% 5 8 13 15 $45.18
29-1123
[More_Info]
Physical Therapists
Assess, plan, organize, and participate in rehabilitative programs that improve mobility, relieve pain, increase strength, and improve or correct disabling conditions resulting from disease or injury.
525 567 42 8% 10 13 23 27 $48.65
29-1124
[More_Info]
Radiation Therapists
Provide radiation therapy to patients as prescribed by a radiologist according to established practices and standards. Duties may include reviewing prescription and diagnosis; acting as liaison with physician and supportive care personnel; preparing equipment, such as immobilization, treatment, and protection devices; and maintaining records, reports, and files. May assist in dosimetry procedures and tumor localization.
38 41 3 7.89% 1 1 2 2 n/a
29-1125
[More_Info]
Recreational Therapists
Plan, direct, or coordinate medically-approved recreation programs for patients in hospitals, nursing homes, or other institutions. Activities include sports, trips, dramatics, social activities, and arts and crafts. May assess a patient condition and recommend appropriate recreational activity. Excludes Recreation Workers (39-9032).
150 163 13 8.67% 3 4 7 8 n/a
29-1126
[More_Info]
Respiratory Therapists
Assess, treat, and care for patients with breathing disorders. Assume primary responsibility for all respiratory care modalities, including the supervision of respiratory therapy technicians. Initiate and conduct therapeutic procedures; maintain patient records; and select, assemble, check, and operate equipment.
166 176 10 6.02% 5 4 9 10 $35.76
29-1127
[More_Info]
Speech-Language Pathologists
Assess and treat persons with speech, language, voice, and fluency disorders. May select alternative communication systems and teach their use. May perform research related to speech and language problems.
256 271 15 5.86% 5 9 14 16 $41.95
29-1129
[More_Info]
Therapists, All Other
All therapists not listed separately.
160 173 13 8.13% 4 5 9 10 $25.58
29-1131
[More_Info]
Veterinarians
Diagnose, treat, or research diseases and injuries of animals. Includes veterinarians who conduct research and development, inspect livestock, or care for pets and companion animals.
162 200 38 23.46% 3 4 7 11 $48.08
29-1141
[More_Info]
Registered Nurses
Assess patient health problems and needs, develop and implement nursing care plans, and maintain medical records. Administer nursing care to ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled patients. May advise patients on health maintenance and disease prevention or provide case management. Licensing or registration required. Includes Clinical Nurse Specialists. Excludes Nurse Anesthetists (29-1151), Nurse Midwives (29-1161), and Nurse Practitioners (29-1171).
5856 6260 404 6.9% 168 155 323 363 $45.81
29-1151
[More_Info]
Nurse Anesthetists
Administer anesthesia, monitor patients vital signs, and oversee patient recovery from anesthesia. May assist anesthesiologists, surgeons, other physicians, or dentists. Must be registered nurses who have specialized graduate education.
73 79 6 8.22% 1 3 4 5 n/a
29-1161
[More_Info]
Nurse Midwives
Diagnose and coordinate all aspects of the birthing process, either independently or as part of a healthcare team. May provide well-woman gynecological care. Must have specialized, graduate nursing education.
108 119 11 10.19% 2 4 6 7 $44.75
29-1171
[More_Info]
Nurse Practitioners
Diagnose and treat acute, episodic, or chronic illness, independently or as part of a healthcare team. May focus on health promotion and disease prevention. May order, perform, or interpret diagnostic tests such as lab work and x rays. May prescribe medication. Must be registered nurses who have specialized graduate education.
348 378 30 8.62% 7 12 19 22 $53.01
29-1181
[More_Info]
Audiologists
Assess and treat persons with hearing and related disorders. May fit hearing aids and provide auditory training. May perform research related to hearing problems.
28 30 2 7.14% 1 1 2 2 $40.58
29-1199
[More_Info]
Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners, All Other
All health diagnosing and treating practitioners not listed separately.
173 190 17 9.83% 5 3 8 10 n/a
29-2000
Health Technologists and Technicians
5232 5659 427 8.16% 160 218 378 421 n/a
29-2010
Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians
598 643 45 7.53% 17 22 39 44 $33.36
29-2021
[More_Info]
Dental Hygienists
Clean teeth and examine oral areas, head, and neck for signs of oral disease. May educate patients on oral hygiene, take and develop x rays, or apply fluoride or sealants.
670 733 63 9.4% 29 18 47 53 n/a
29-2031
[More_Info]
Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians
Conduct tests on pulmonary or cardiovascular systems of patients for diagnostic purposes. May conduct or assist in electrocardiograms, cardiac catheterizations, pulmonary functions, lung capacity, and similar tests. Includes vascular technologists.
64 69 5 7.81% 2 2 4 4 $30.40
29-2032
[More_Info]
Diagnostic Medical Sonographers
Produce ultrasonic recordings of internal organs for use by physicians.
131 142 11 8.4% 3 4 7 8 $46.15
29-2033
[More_Info]
Nuclear Medicine Technologists
Prepare, administer, and measure radioactive isotopes in therapeutic, diagnostic, and tracer studies using a variety of radioisotope equipment. Prepare stock solutions of radioactive materials and calculate doses to be administered by radiologists. Subject patients to radiation. Execute blood volume, red cell survival, and fat absorption studies following standard laboratory techniques.
35 38 3 8.57% 1 1 2 2 n/a
29-2034
[More_Info]
Radiologic Technologists
Take x rays and CAT scans or administer nonradioactive materials into patient's blood stream for diagnostic purposes. Includes technologists who specialize in other scanning modalities. Excludes Diagnostic Medical Sonographers(29-2032) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologists (29-2035).
464 500 36 7.76% 12 15 27 31 $38.14
29-2035
[More_Info]
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologists
Operate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners. Monitor patient safety and comfort, and view images of area being scanned to ensure quality of pictures. May administer gadolinium contrast dosage intravenously. May interview patient, explain MRI procedures, and position patient on examining table. May enter into the computer data such as patient history, anatomical area to be scanned, orientation specified, and position of entry.
52 56 4 7.69% 1 2 3 3 $43.92
29-2041
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Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics
Assess injuries, administer emergency medical care, and extricate trapped individuals. Transport injured or sick persons to medical facilities.
370 395 25 6.76% 7 19 26 28 n/a
29-2051
[More_Info]
Dietetic Technicians
Assist in the provision of food service and nutritional programs, under the supervision of a dietitian. May plan and produce meals based on established guidelines, teach principles of food and nutrition, or counsel individuals.
47 51 4 8.51% 1 3 4 4 $20.12
29-2052
[More_Info]
Pharmacy Technicians
Prepare medications under the direction of a pharmacist. May measure, mix, count out, label, and record amounts and dosages of medications according to prescription orders.
490 498 8 1.63% 14 26 40 41 $22.32
29-2053
[More_Info]
Psychiatric Technicians
Care for individuals with mental or emotional conditions or disabilities, following the instructions of physicians or other health practitioners. Monitor patients' physical and emotional well-being and report to medical staff. May participate in rehabilitation and treatment programs, help with personal hygiene, and administer oral or injectable medications.
307 334 27 8.79% 9 17 26 29 $20.35
29-2055
[More_Info]
Surgical Technologists
Assist in operations, under the supervision of surgeons, registered nurses, or other surgical personnel. May help set up operating room, prepare and transport patients for surgery, adjust lights and equipment, pass instruments and other supplies to surgeons and surgeon's assistants, hold retractors, cut sutures, and help count sponges, needles, supplies, and instruments.
219 235 16 7.31% 7 12 19 21 $32.27
29-2056
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Veterinary Technologists and Technicians
Perform medical tests in a laboratory environment for use in the treatment and diagnosis of diseases in animals. Prepare vaccines and serums for prevention of diseases. Prepare tissue samples, take blood samples, and execute laboratory tests, such as urinalysis and blood counts. Clean and sterilize instruments and materials and maintain equipment and machines. May assist a veterinarian during surgery.
188 238 50 26.6% 6 11 17 22 $20.35
29-2057
[More_Info]
Ophthalmic Medical Technicians
Assist ophthalmologists by performing ophthalmic clinical functions. May administer eye exams, administer eye medications, and instruct the patient in care and use of corrective lenses.
72 78 6 8.33% 2 4 6 7 $24.46
29-2061
[More_Info]
Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses
Care for ill, injured, or convalescing patients or persons with disabilities in hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, private homes, group homes, and similar institutions. May work under the supervision of a registered nurse. Licensing required.
522 573 51 9.77% 19 23 42 47 $32.51
29-2071
[More_Info]
Medical Records and Health Information Technicians
Compile, process, and maintain medical records of hospital and clinic patients in a manner consistent with medical, administrative, ethical, legal, and regulatory requirements of the health care system. Process, maintain, compile, and report patient information for health requirements and standards in a manner consistent with the healthcare industrys numerical coding system. Excludes File Clerks (43-4071).
538 578 40 7.43% 16 19 35 39 n/a
29-2081
[More_Info]
Opticians, Dispensing
Design, measure, fit, and adapt lenses and frames for client according to written optical prescription or specification. Assist client with inserting, removing, and caring for contact lenses. Assist client with selecting frames. Measure customer for size of eyeglasses and coordinate frames with facial and eye measurements and optical prescription. Prepare work order for optical laboratory containing instructions for grinding and mounting lenses in frames. Verify exactness of finished lens spectacles. Adjust frame and lens position to fit client. May shape or reshape frames. Includes contact lens opticians.
152 159 7 4.61% 6 6 12 13 $27.64
29-2099
[More_Info]
Health Technologists and Technicians, All Other
All health technologists and technicians not listed separately.
280 302 22 7.86% 8 12 20 22 n/a
29-9000
Other Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations
907 968 61 6.73% 22 30 52 58 n/a
29-9011
[More_Info]
Occupational Health and Safety Specialists
Review, evaluate, and analyze work environments and design programs and procedures to control, eliminate, and prevent disease or injury caused by chemical, physical, and biological agents or ergonomic factors. May conduct inspections and enforce adherence to laws and regulations governing the health and safety of individuals. May be employed in the public or private sector. Includes environmental protection officers.
449 475 26 5.79% 11 15 26 29 n/a
29-9012
[More_Info]
Occupational Health and Safety Technicians
Collect data on work environments for analysis by occupational health and safety specialists. Implement and conduct evaluation of programs designed to limit chemical, physical, biological, and ergonomic risks to workers.
152 163 11 7.24% 4 5 9 10 n/a
29-9091
[More_Info]
Athletic Trainers
Evaluate and advise individuals to assist recovery from or avoid athletic-related injuries or illnesses, or maintain peak physical fitness. May provide first aid or emergency care.
41 44 3 7.32% 1 1 2 2 n/a
29-9099
[More_Info]
Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Workers, All Other
All healthcare practitioners and technical workers not listed separately.
263 284 21 7.98% 6 9 15 17 n/a

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Healthcare Support

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
31-1000
Nursing, Psychiatric, and Home Health Aides
3432 3867 435 12.67% 197 213 410 454 n/a
31-1011
[More_Info]
Home Health Aides
Provide routine individualized healthcare such as changing bandages and dressing wounds, and applying topical medications to the elderly, convalescents, or persons with disabilities at the patients home or in a care facility. Monitor or report changes in health status. May also provide personal care such as bathing, dressing, and grooming of patient.
1093 1345 252 23.06% 66 71 137 162 n/a
31-1013
[More_Info]
Psychiatric Aides
Assist mentally impaired or emotionally disturbed patients, working under direction of nursing and medical staff. May assist with daily living activities, lead patients in educational and recreational activities, or accompany patients to and from examinations and treatments. May restrain violent patients. Includes psychiatric orderlies.
149 151 2 1.34% 8 9 17 17 n/a
31-1014
[More_Info]
Nursing Assistants
Provide basic patient care under direction of nursing staff. Perform duties such as feed, bathe, dress, groom, or move patients, or change linens. May transfer or transport patients. Includes nursing care attendants, nursing aides, and nursing attendants. Excludes Home Health Aides (31-1011), Orderlies (31-1015), Personal Care Aides (39-9021), and Psychiatric Aides (31-1013).
2109 2284 175 8.3% 118 128 246 264 n/a
31-1015
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Orderlies
Transport patients to areas such as operating rooms or x-ray rooms using wheelchairs, stretchers, or moveable beds. May maintain stocks of supplies or clean and transport equipment. Psychiatric orderlies are included in Psychiatric Aides (31-1013). Excludes Nursing Assistants (31-1014).
81 87 6 7.41% 5 5 10 11 n/a
31-2000
Occupational and Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides
192 208 16 8.33% 8 15 23 25 n/a
31-2021
[More_Info]
Physical Therapist Assistants
Assist physical therapists in providing physical therapy treatments and procedures. May, in accordance with State laws, assist in the development of treatment plans, carry out routine functions, document the progress of treatment, and modify specific treatments in accordance with patient status and within the scope of treatment plans established by a physical therapist. Generally requires formal training.
90 97 7 7.78% 4 8 12 13 $28.48
31-2022
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Physical Therapist Aides
Under close supervision of a physical therapist or physical therapy assistant, perform only delegated, selected, or routine tasks in specific situations. These duties include preparing the patient and the treatment area.
76 83 7 9.21% 3 6 9 10 $17.91
31-9000
Other Healthcare Support Occupations
5312 5831 519 9.77% 260 382 642 694 n/a
31-9011
[More_Info]
Massage Therapists
Perform therapeutic massages of soft tissues and joints. May assist in the assessment of range of motion and muscle strength, or propose client therapy plans.
518 560 42 8.11% 34 29 63 67 $37.88
31-9091
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Dental Assistants
Assist dentist, set up equipment, prepare patient for treatment, and keep records.
1213 1322 109 8.99% 59 83 142 153 $24.63
31-9092
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Medical Assistants
Perform administrative and certain clinical duties under the direction of a physician. Administrative duties may include scheduling appointments, maintaining medical records, billing, and coding information for insurance purposes. Clinical duties may include taking and recording vital signs and medical histories, preparing patients for examination, drawing blood, and administering medications as directed by physician. Excludes Physician Assistants (29-1071).
1742 1892 150 8.61% 71 129 200 215 $22.41
31-9093
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Medical Equipment Preparers
Prepare, sterilize, install, or clean laboratory or healthcare equipment. May perform routine laboratory tasks and operate or inspect equipment.
88 92 4 4.55% 4 6 10 10 $24.21
31-9094
[More_Info]
Medical Transcriptionists
Transcribe medical reports recorded by physicians and other healthcare practitioners using various electronic devices, covering office visits, emergency room visits, diagnostic imaging studies, operations, chart reviews, and final summaries. Transcribe dictated reports and translate abbreviations into fully understandable form. Edit as necessary and return reports in either printed or electronic form for review and signature, or correction.
102 111 9 8.82% 6 8 14 15 $17.56
31-9095
[More_Info]
Pharmacy Aides
Record drugs delivered to the pharmacy, store incoming merchandise, and inform the supervisor of stock needs. May operate cash register and accept prescriptions for filling.
34 35 1 2.94% 2 3 5 5 n/a
31-9096
[More_Info]
Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretakers
Feed, water, and examine pets and other nonfarm animals for signs of illness, disease, or injury in laboratories and animal hospitals and clinics. Clean and disinfect cages and work areas, and sterilize laboratory and surgical equipment. May provide routine post-operative care, administer medication orally or topically, or prepare samples for laboratory examination under the supervision of veterinary or laboratory animal technologists or technicians, veterinarians, or scientists. Excludes Nonfarm Animal Caretakers (39-2021).
265 333 68 25.66% 16 32 48 55 $16.21
31-9097
[More_Info]
Phlebotomists
Draw blood for tests, transfusions, donations, or research. May explain the procedure to patients and assist in the recovery of patients with adverse reactions.
130 140 10 7.69% 5 9 14 15 $20.80
31-9099
[More_Info]
Healthcare Support Workers, All Other
All healthcare support workers not listed separately
1220 1346 126 10.33% 63 83 146 159 $25.05

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Installation, Maintenance, and Repair

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
49-1000
Supervisors of Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers
672 720 48 7.14% 22 42 64 69 n/a
49-1011
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First-Line Supervisors of Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers
Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of mechanics, installers, and repairers. Excludes team or work leaders.
672 720 48 7.14% 22 42 64 69 $43.88
49-2000
Electrical and Electronic Equipment Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers
1734 1749 15 0.87% 44 135 179 180 n/a
49-2011
[More_Info]
Computer, Automated Teller, and Office Machine Repairers
Repair, maintain, or install computers, word processing systems, automated teller machines, and electronic office machines, such as duplicating and fax machines.
127 133 6 4.72% 4 10 14 15 $23.17
49-2021
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Radio, Cellular, and Tower Equipment Installers and Repairers
Repair, install or maintain mobile or stationary radio transmitting, broadcasting, and receiving equipment, and two-way radio communications systems used in cellular telecommunications, mobile broadband, ship-to-shore, aircraft-to-ground communications, and radio equipment in service and emergency vehicles. May test and analyze network coverage.
81 78 -3 -3.7% 2 7 9 9 $31.49
49-2022
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Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers
Install, set-up, rearrange, or remove switching, distribution, routing, and dialing equipment used in central offices or headends. Service or repair telephone, cable television, Internet, and other communications equipment on customers' property. May install communications equipment or communications wiring in buildings. Excludes Telecommunications Line Installers and Repairers (49-9052).
770 752 -18 -2.34% 21 63 84 82 $38.37
49-2091
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Avionics Technicians
Install, inspect, test, adjust, or repair avionics equipment, such as radar, radio, navigation, and missile control systems in aircraft or space vehicles.
116 113 -3 -2.59% 3 6 9 9 $33.17
49-2092
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Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers
Repair, maintain, or install electric motors, wiring, or switches.
28 30 2 7.14% 1 2 3 3 n/a
49-2093
[More_Info]
Electrical and Electronics Installers and Repairers, Transportation Equipment
Install, adjust, or maintain mobile electronics communication equipment, including sound, sonar, security, navigation, and surveillance systems on trains, watercraft, or other mobile equipment. Excludes Avionics Technicians (49-2091) and Electronic Equipment Installers and Repairers, Motor Vehicles (49-2096).
32 31 -1 -3.13% 1 2 3 3 n/a
49-2094
[More_Info]
Electrical and Electronics Repairers, Commercial and Industrial Equipment
Repair, test, adjust, or install electronic equipment, such as industrial controls, transmitters, and antennas. Excludes Avionics Technicians (49-2091), Electronic Equipment Installers and Repairers, Motor Vehicles (49-2096), and Electrical and Electronics Installers and Repairers, Transportation Equipment (49-2093).
294 307 13 4.42% 5 21 26 27 $37.27
49-2095
[More_Info]
Electrical and Electronics Repairers, Powerhouse, Substation, and Relay
Inspect, test, repair, or maintain electrical equipment in generating stations, substations, and in-service relays.
118 120 2 1.69% 2 8 10 10 $45.57
49-2098
[More_Info]
Security and Fire Alarm Systems Installers
Install, program, maintain, and repair security and fire alarm wiring and equipment. Ensure that work is in accordance with relevant codes. Excludes Electricians (47-2111) who do a broad range of electrical wiring.
132 150 18 13.64% 4 13 17 19 $34.84
49-3000
Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers
5787 6137 350 6.05% 171 390 561 596 n/a
49-3011
[More_Info]
Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians
Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul aircraft engines and assemblies, such as hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Includes helicopter and aircraft engine specialists. Excludes Avionics Technician (49-2091).
1476 1504 28 1.9% 40 82 122 125 $32.45
49-3021
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Automotive Body and Related Repairers
Repair and refinish automotive vehicle bodies and straighten vehicle frames. Excludes Painters, Transportation Equipment (51-9122) and Automotive Glass Installers and Repairers (49-3022).
331 360 29 8.76% 11 22 33 36 $25.91
49-3022
[More_Info]
Automotive Glass Installers and Repairers
Replace or repair broken windshields and window glass in motor vehicles.
68 74 6 8.82% 2 5 7 8 $19.15
49-3023
[More_Info]
Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics
Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul automotive vehicles. Excludes Automotive Body and Related Repairers (49-3021), Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists (49-3031), and Electronic Equipment Installers and Repairers, Motor Vehicles (49-2096).
1731 1829 98 5.66% 48 125 173 183 $25.24
49-3031
[More_Info]
Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists
Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul buses and trucks, or maintain and repair any type of diesel engines. Includes mechanics working primarily with automobile or marine diesel engines.
701 747 46 6.56% 20 47 67 72 $30.63
49-3042
[More_Info]
Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines
Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul mobile mechanical, hydraulic, and pneumatic equipment, such as cranes, bulldozers, graders, and conveyors, used in construction, logging, and surface mining. Excludes Rail Car Repairers (49-3043) and Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists (49-3031).
822 910 88 10.71% 27 59 86 95 $36.57
49-3043
[More_Info]
Rail Car Repairers
Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul railroad rolling stock, mine cars, or mass transit rail cars. Excludes Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists (49-3031).
55 61 6 10.91% 2 4 6 7 n/a
49-3051
[More_Info]
Motorboat Mechanics and Service Technicians
Repair and adjust electrical and mechanical equipment of inboard or inboard-outboard boat engines. Excludes Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists (49-3031).
70 77 7 10% 3 4 7 8 $22.03
49-3052
[More_Info]
Motorcycle Mechanics
Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul motorcycles, scooters, mopeds, dirt bikes, or similar motorized vehicles.
42 44 2 4.76% 2 3 5 5 $18.44
49-3053
[More_Info]
Outdoor Power Equipment and Other Small Engine Mechanics
Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul small engines used to power lawn mowers, chain saws, recreational sporting equipment and related equipment.
120 136 16 13.33% 5 8 13 15 $21.65
49-3092
[More_Info]
Recreational Vehicle Service Technicians
Diagnose, inspect, adjust, repair, or overhaul recreational vehicles including travel trailers. May specialize in maintaining gas, electrical, hydraulic, plumbing, or chassis/towing systems as well as repairing generators, appliances, and interior components. Includes workers who perform customized van conversions. Excludes Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics (49-3023) and Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists (49-3031) who also work on recreation vehicles.
46 49 3 6.52% 1 4 5 5 $24.42
49-3093
[More_Info]
Tire Repairers and Changers
Repair and replace tires.
302 321 19 6.29% 9 25 34 36 $15.17
49-9000
Other Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations
7638 8005 367 4.8% 283 506 789 826 n/a
49-9012
[More_Info]
Control and Valve Installers and Repairers, Except Mechanical Door
Install, repair, and maintain mechanical regulating and controlling devices, such as electric meters, gas regulators, thermostats, safety and flow valves, and other mechanical governors.
112 118 6 5.36% 3 7 10 11 n/a
49-9021
[More_Info]
Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers
Install or repair heating, central air conditioning, or refrigeration systems, including oil burners, hot-air furnaces, and heating stoves.
341 365 24 7.04% 10 25 35 37 $38.28
49-9031
[More_Info]
Home Appliance Repairers
Repair, adjust, or install all types of electric or gas household appliances, such as refrigerators, washers, dryers, and ovens.
36 35 -1 -2.78% 2 2 4 4 $21.53
49-9041
[More_Info]
Industrial Machinery Mechanics
Repair, install, adjust, or maintain industrial production and processing machinery or refinery and pipeline distribution systems. Excludes Millwrights (49-9044), Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines (49-3042), and Maintenance Workers, Machinery (49-9043).
360 400 40 11.11% 12 23 35 39 $31.68
49-9043
[More_Info]
Maintenance Workers, Machinery
Lubricate machinery, change parts, or perform other routine machinery maintenance. Excludes Maintenance and Repair Workers, General (49-9071).
285 309 24 8.42% 11 16 27 29 $30.62
49-9044
[More_Info]
Millwrights
Install, dismantle, or move machinery and heavy equipment according to layout plans, blueprints, or other drawings.
155 190 35 22.58% 5 10 15 18 $33.56
49-9051
[More_Info]
Electrical Power-Line Installers and Repairers
Install or repair cables or wires used in electrical power or distribution systems. May erect poles and light or heavy duty transmission towers. Excludes Electrical and Electronics Repairers, Powerhouse, Substation, and Relay (49-2095).
383 387 4 1.04% 9 23 32 32 $45.77
49-9052
[More_Info]
Telecommunications Line Installers and Repairers
Install and repair telecommunications cable, including fiber optics.
231 228 -3 -1.3% 5 20 25 25 $33.45
49-9062
[More_Info]
Medical Equipment Repairers
Test, adjust, or repair biomedical or electromedical equipment.
39 38 -1 -2.56% 2 2 4 4 $32.18
49-9069
[More_Info]
Precision Instrument and Equipment Repairers, All Other
All precision instrument and equipment repairers not listed separately.
63 66 3 4.76% 3 4 7 7 n/a
49-9071
[More_Info]
Maintenance and Repair Workers, General
Perform work involving the skills of two or more maintenance or craft occupations to keep machines, mechanical equipment, or the structure of an establishment in repair. Duties may involve pipe fitting; boiler making; insulating; welding; machining; carpentry; repairing electrical or mechanical equipment; installing, aligning, and balancing new equipment; and repairing buildings, floors, or stairs. Excludes Maintenance Workers, Machinery (49-9043).
3607 3762 155 4.3% 129 228 357 372 $25.60
49-9091
[More_Info]
Coin, Vending, and Amusement Machine Servicers and Repairers
Install, service, adjust, or repair coin, vending, or amusement machines including video games, juke boxes, pinball machines, or slot machines.
56 55 -1 -1.79% 2 4 6 6 n/a
49-9092
[More_Info]
Commercial Divers
Work below surface of water, using scuba gear to inspect, repair, remove, or install equipment and structures. May use a variety of power and hand tools, such as drills, sledgehammers, torches, and welding equipment. May conduct tests or experiments, rig explosives, or photograph structures or marine life. Excludes Fishers and Related Fishing Workers (45-3011), Athletes and Sports Competitors (27-2021), and Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers (33-3051).
29 36 7 24.14% 1 2 3 4 $48.14
49-9094
[More_Info]
Locksmiths and Safe Repairers
Repair and open locks; make keys; change locks and safe combinations; and install and repair safes.
41 46 5 12.2% 2 3 5 6 n/a
49-9096
[More_Info]
Riggers
Set up or repair rigging for construction projects, manufacturing plants, logging yards, ships and shipyards, or for the entertainment industry.
34 38 4 11.76% 1 3 4 4 $32.64
49-9098
[More_Info]
Helpers--Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers
Help installation, maintenance, and repair workers in maintenance, parts replacement, and repair of vehicles, industrial machinery, and electrical and electronic equipment. Perform duties such as furnishing tools, materials, and supplies to other workers; cleaning work area, machines, and tools; and holding materials or tools for other workers.
831 883 52 6.26% 46 64 110 115 $21.77
49-9099
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Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers, All Other
All, installation, maintenance, and repair workers not listed separately.
982 996 14 1.43% 39 67 106 107 $37.95

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Legal

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
23-1000
Lawyers, Judges, and Related Workers
1132 1065 -67 -5.92% 22 28 50 43 n/a
23-1011
[More_Info]
Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.
985 923 -62 -6.29% 20 25 45 39 $55.98
23-1012
[More_Info]
Judicial Law Clerks
Assist judges in court or by conducting research or preparing legal documents. Excludes Lawyers (23-1011) and Paralegals and Legal Assistants (23-2011).
77 75 -2 -2.6% 1 2 3 3 n/a
23-1021
[More_Info]
Administrative Law Judges, Adjudicators, and Hearing Officers
Conduct hearings to recommend or make decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters. Determine liability, sanctions, or penalties, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims or settlements. Excludes Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators (23-1022).
42 41 -1 -2.38% 1 1 2 2 n/a
23-2000
Legal Support Workers
854 773 -81 -9.48% 27 53 80 72 n/a
23-2011
[More_Info]
Paralegals and Legal Assistants
Assist lawyers by investigating facts, preparing legal documents, or researching legal precedent. Conduct research to support a legal proceeding, to formulate a defense, or to initiate legal action. Excludes Legal Secretaries (43-6012).
530 472 -58 -10.94% 17 36 53 47 $28.27
23-2093
[More_Info]
Title Examiners, Abstractors, and Searchers
Search real estate records, examine titles, or summarize pertinent legal or insurance documents or details for a variety of purposes. May compile lists of mortgages, contracts, and other instruments pertaining to titles by searching public and private records for law firms, real estate agencies, or title insurance companies.
109 99 -10 -9.17% 3 6 9 8 $28.12
23-2099
[More_Info]
Legal Support Workers, All Other
All legal support workers not listed separately.
213 200 -13 -6.1% 7 11 18 17 $32.02

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Life, Physical, and Social Science

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
19-1000
Life Scientists
2008 2030 22 1.1% 31 159 190 192 n/a
19-1013
[More_Info]
Soil and Plant Scientists
Conduct research in breeding, physiology, production, yield, and management of crops and agricultural plants or trees, shrubs, and nursery stock, their growth in soils, and control of pests; or study the chemical, physical, biological, and mineralogical composition of soils as they relate to plant or crop growth. May classify and map soils and investigate effects of alternative practices on soil and crop productivity.
53 56 3 5.66% 1 5 6 6 n/a
19-1022
[More_Info]
Microbiologists
Investigate the growth, structure, development, and other characteristics of microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, algae, or fungi. Includes medical microbiologists who study the relationship between organisms and disease or the effects of antibiotics on microorganisms.
26 25 -1 -3.85% 0 2 2 2 n/a
19-1023
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Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists
Study the origins, behavior, diseases, genetics, and life processes of animals and wildlife. May specialize in wildlife research and management. May collect and analyze biological data to determine the environmental effects of present and potential use of land and water habitats.
920 927 7 0.76% 14 70 84 85 $38.92
19-1029
[More_Info]
Biological Scientists, All Other
All biological scientists not listed separately.
441 442 1 0.23% 7 34 41 41 $41.38
19-1031
[More_Info]
Conservation Scientists
Manage, improve, and protect natural resources to maximize their use without damaging the environment. May conduct soil surveys and develop plans to eliminate soil erosion or to protect rangelands. May instruct farmers, agricultural production managers, or ranchers in best ways to use crop rotation, contour plowing, or terracing to conserve soil and water; in the number and kind of livestock and forage plants best suited to particular ranges; and in range and farm improvements, such as fencing and reservoirs for stock watering. Excludes Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists (19-1023) and Foresters (19-1032).
206 217 11 5.34% 4 18 22 23 $37.42
19-1032
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Foresters
Manage public and private forested lands for economic, recreational, and conservation purposes. May inventory the type, amount, and location of standing timber, appraise the timber's worth, negotiate the purchase, and draw up contracts for procurement. May determine how to conserve wildlife habitats, creek beds, water quality, and soil stability, and how best to comply with environmental regulations. May devise plans for planting and growing new trees, monitor trees for healthy growth, and determine optimal harvesting schedules.
90 88 -2 -2.22% 2 8 10 10 $36.60
19-1042
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Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists
Conduct research dealing with the understanding of human diseases and the improvement of human health. Engage in clinical investigation, research and development, or other related activities. Includes physicians, dentists, public health specialists, pharmacologists, and medical pathologists who primarily conduct research. Practitioners who primarily provide medical or dental care or dispense drugs are included in Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners (29-1000).
71 76 5 7.04% 1 6 7 8 $46.71
19-1099
[More_Info]
Life Scientists, All Other
All life scientists not listed separately.
153 148 -5 -3.27% 2 11 13 12 n/a
19-2000
Physical Scientists
1343 1454 111 8.27% 25 120 145 156 n/a
19-2021
[More_Info]
Atmospheric and Space Scientists
Investigate atmospheric phenomena and interpret meteorological data, gathered by surface and air stations, satellites, and radar to prepare reports and forecasts for public and other uses. Includes weather analysts and forecasters whose functions require the detailed knowledge of meteorology.
92 91 -1 -1.09% 2 7 9 9 $42.95
19-2031
[More_Info]
Chemists
Conduct qualitative and quantitative chemical analyses or experiments in laboratories for quality or process control or to develop new products or knowledge. Excludes Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and Geographers (19-2042) and Biochemists and Biophysicists (19-1021).
77 88 11 14.29% 1 6 7 8 $43.67
19-2041
[More_Info]
Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including Health
Conduct research or perform investigation for the purpose of identifying, abating, or eliminating sources of pollutants or hazards that affect either the environment or the health of the population. Using knowledge of various scientific disciplines, may collect, synthesize, study, report, and recommend action based on data derived from measurements or observations of air, food, soil, water, and other sources. Excludes Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists (19-1023), Conservation Scientists (19-1031), Forest and Conservation Technicians (19-4093), Fish and Game Wardens (33-3031), and Forest and Conservation Workers (45-4011).
613 689 76 12.4% 12 58 70 78 $37.94
19-2042
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Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and Geographers
Study the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of the Earth. May use geological, physics, and mathematics knowledge in exploration for oil, gas, minerals, or underground water; or in waste disposal, land reclamation, or other environmental problems. May study the Earth's internal composition, atmospheres, oceans, and its magnetic, electrical, and gravitational forces. Includes mineralogists, crystallographers, paleontologists, stratigraphers, geodesists, and seismologists.
345 370 25 7.25% 7 32 39 42 $48.65
19-2043
[More_Info]
Hydrologists
Research the distribution, circulation, and physical properties of underground and surface waters; and study the form and intensity of precipitation, its rate of infiltration into the soil, movement through the earth, and its return to the ocean and atmosphere.
64 65 1 1.56% 1 6 7 7 $44.70
19-2099
[More_Info]
Physical Scientists, All Other
All physical scientists not listed separately.
141 141 0 0% 2 10 12 12 $50.31
19-3000
Social Scientists and Related Workers
749 766 17 2.27% 19 54 73 75 n/a
19-3011
[More_Info]
Economists
Conduct research, prepare reports, or formulate plans to address economic problems related to the production and distribution of goods and services or monetary and fiscal policy. May collect and process economic and statistical data using sampling techniques and econometric methods. Excludes Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists (13-1161).
43 46 3 6.98% 1 3 4 4 $44.99
19-3022
[More_Info]
Survey Researchers
Plan, develop, or conduct surveys. May analyze and interpret the meaning of survey data, determine survey objectives, or suggest or test question wording. Includes social scientists who primarily design questionnaires or supervise survey teams. Excludes Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists (13-1161) and Statisticians (15-2041).
36 36 0 0% 1 3 4 4 n/a
19-3031
[More_Info]
Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists
Diagnose and treat mental disorders; learning disabilities; and cognitive, behavioral, and emotional problems, using individual, child, family, and group therapies. May design and implement behavior modification programs.
131 137 6 4.58% 3 6 9 10 $39.18
19-3039
[More_Info]
Psychologists, All Other
All psychologists not listed separately.
27 27 0 0% 1 1 2 2 $56.86
19-3051
[More_Info]
Urban and Regional Planners
Develop comprehensive plans and programs for use of land and physical facilities of jurisdictions, such as towns, cities, counties, and metropolitan areas.
186 186 0 0% 3 14 17 17 $41.15
19-3091
[More_Info]
Anthropologists and Archeologists
Study the origin, development, and behavior of human beings. May study the way of life, language, or physical characteristics of people in various parts of the world. May engage in systematic recovery and examination of material evidence, such as tools or pottery remaining from past human cultures, in order to determine the history, customs, and living habits of earlier civilizations.
92 101 9 9.78% 3 8 11 12 $42.47
19-3093
[More_Info]
Historians
Research, analyze, record, and interpret the past as recorded in sources, such as government and institutional records, newspapers and other periodicals, photographs, interviews, films, electronic media, and unpublished manuscripts, such as personal diaries and letters.
25 26 1 4% 1 2 3 3 $48.99
19-3099
[More_Info]
Social Scientists and Related Workers, All Other
All social scientists and related workers not listed separately.
191 189 -2 -1.05% 6 16 22 22 $38.81
19-4000
Life, Physical, and Social Science Technicians
2164 2237 73 3.37% 45 196 241 248 n/a
19-4021
[More_Info]
Biological Technicians
Assist biological and medical scientists in laboratories. Set up, operate, and maintain laboratory instruments and equipment, monitor experiments, make observations, and calculate and record results. May analyze organic substances, such as blood, food, and drugs.
574 563 -11 -1.92% 8 51 59 58 $22.08
19-4031
[More_Info]
Chemical Technicians
Conduct chemical and physical laboratory tests to assist scientists in making qualitative and quantitative analyses of solids, liquids, and gaseous materials for research and development of new products or processes, quality control, maintenance of environmental standards, and other work involving experimental, theoretical, or practical application of chemistry and related sciences.
143 165 22 15.38% 3 12 15 17 $33.97
19-4041
[More_Info]
Geological and Petroleum Technicians
Assist scientists or engineers in the use of electronic, sonic, or nuclear measuring instruments in both laboratory and production activities to obtain data indicating potential resources such as metallic ore, minerals, gas, coal, or petroleum. Analyze mud and drill cuttings. Chart pressure, temperature, and other characteristics of wells or bore holes. Investigate and collect information leading to the possible discovery of new metallic ore, minerals, gas, coal, or petroleum deposits.
324 368 44 13.58% 4 30 34 38 n/a
19-4061
[More_Info]
Social Science Research Assistants
Assist social scientists in laboratory, survey, and other social science research. May help prepare findings for publication and assist in laboratory analysis, quality control, or data management. Excludes Graduate Teaching Assistants (25-1191).
65 66 1 1.54% 2 6 8 8 n/a
19-4091
[More_Info]
Environmental Science and Protection Technicians, Including Health
Perform laboratory and field tests to monitor the environment and investigate sources of pollution, including those that affect health, under the direction of an environmental scientist, engineer, or other specialist. May collect samples of gases, soil, water, and other materials for testing.
252 274 22 8.73% 7 24 31 33 n/a
19-4093
[More_Info]
Forest and Conservation Technicians
Provide technical assistance regarding the conservation of soil, water, forests, or related natural resources. May compile data pertaining to size, content, condition, and other characteristics of forest tracts, under the direction of foresters; or train and lead forest workers in forest propagation, fire prevention and suppression. May assist conservation scientists in managing, improving, and protecting rangelands and wildlife habitats. Excludes Conservation Scientists (19-1031) and Foresters (19-1032).
402 399 -3 -0.75% 11 37 48 48 n/a
19-4099
[More_Info]
Life, Physical, and Social Science Technicians, All Other
All life, physical, and social science technicians not listed separately.
377 370 -7 -1.86% 10 34 44 43 $31.48

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Management

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
11-1000
Top Executives
6295 6671 376 5.97% 147 386 533 571 n/a
11-1011
[More_Info]
Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
1704 1830 126 7.39% 47 79 126 139 $79.98
11-1021
[More_Info]
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services. Excludes First-Line Supervisors.
4368 4622 254 5.82% 94 296 390 415 $52.97
11-2000
Advertising, Marketing, Promotions, Public Relations, and Sales Managers
1476 1569 93 6.3% 32 104 136 145 n/a
11-2011
[More_Info]
Advertising and Promotions Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate advertising policies and programs or produce collateral materials, such as posters, contests, coupons, or give-aways, to create extra interest in the purchase of a product or service for a department, an entire organization, or on an account basis.
121 130 9 7.44% 3 9 12 13 $37.76
11-2021
[More_Info]
Marketing Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate marketing policies and programs, such as determining the demand for products and services offered by a firm and its competitors, and identify potential customers. Develop pricing strategies with the goal of maximizing the firm's profits or share of the market while ensuring the firm's customers are satisfied. Oversee product development or monitor trends that indicate the need for new products and services.
349 376 27 7.74% 7 25 32 35 $48.89
11-2022
[More_Info]
Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.
808 846 38 4.7% 17 57 74 78 $42.12
11-2031
[More_Info]
Public Relations and Fundraising Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities designed to create or maintain a favorable public image or raise issue awareness for their organization or client; or if engaged in fundraising, plan, direct, or coordinate activities to solicit and maintain funds for special projects or nonprofit organizations.
198 217 19 9.6% 5 13 18 20 n/a
11-3000
Operations Specialties Managers
4716 4932 216 4.58% 108 281 389 411 n/a
11-3011
[More_Info]
Administrative Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services. Medical records administrators are included in Medical and Health Services Managers (11-9111). Excludes Purchasing Managers (11-3061).
1234 1300 66 5.35% 35 71 106 113 n/a
11-3021
[More_Info]
Computer and Information Systems Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming. Excludes Computer Occupations (15-1111 through 15-1199).
931 963 32 3.44% 16 58 74 77 $57.07
11-3031
[More_Info]
Financial Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment.
1146 1188 42 3.66% 25 65 90 94 $53.46
11-3051
[More_Info]
Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
61 63 2 3.28% 1 3 4 4 $60.85
11-3061
[More_Info]
Purchasing Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of buyers, purchasing officers, and related workers involved in purchasing materials, products, and services. Includes wholesale or retail trade merchandising managers and procurement managers.
178 189 11 6.18% 4 11 15 16 $52.37
11-3071
[More_Info]
Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
358 376 18 5.03% 8 21 29 31 $46.95
11-3111
[More_Info]
Compensation and Benefits Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate compensation and benefits activities of an organization. Job analysis and position description managers are included in Human Resource Managers (11-3121).
79 81 2 2.53% 2 5 7 7 $54.65
11-3121
[More_Info]
Human Resources Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate human resources activities and staff of an organization. Excludes managers who primarily focus on compensation and benefits (11-3111) and training and development (11-3131).
561 595 34 6.06% 13 36 49 52 $58.40
11-3131
[More_Info]
Training and Development Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the training and development activities and staff of an organization.
168 177 9 5.36% 4 11 15 16 $46.30
11-9000
Other Management Occupations
7274 7675 401 5.51% 195 409 604 644 n/a
11-9013
[More_Info]
Farmers, Ranchers, and Other Agricultural Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the management or operation of farms, ranches, greenhouses, aquacultural operations, nurseries, timber tracts, or other agricultural establishments. May hire, train, and supervise farm workers or contract for services to carry out the day-to-day activities of the managed operation. May engage in or supervise planting, cultivating, harvesting, and financial and marketing activities. Excludes First-Line Supervisors of Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Workers (45-1011).
26 37 11 42.31% 2 1 3 4 n/a
11-9021
[More_Info]
Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.
993 1089 96 9.67% 22 53 75 85 $49.79
11-9031
[More_Info]
Education Administrators, Preschool and Childcare Center/Program
Plan, direct, or coordinate the academic and nonacademic activities of preschool and childcare centers or programs. Excludes Preschool Teachers (25-2011).
131 136 5 3.82% 3 7 10 10 $28.66
11-9032
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Education Administrators, Elementary and Secondary School
Plan, direct, or coordinate the academic, administrative, or auxiliary activities of public or private elementary or secondary level schools.
449 446 -3 -0.67% 12 23 35 35 n/a
11-9033
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Education Administrators, Postsecondary
Plan, direct, or coordinate research, instructional, student administration and services, and other educational activities at postsecondary institutions, including universities, colleges, and junior and community colleges.
163 156 -7 -4.29% 4 8 12 11 $56.91
11-9039
[More_Info]
Education Administrators, All Other
All education administrators not listed separately.
230 231 1 0.43% 6 12 18 18 $37.95
11-9041
[More_Info]
Architectural and Engineering Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as architecture and engineering or research and development in these fields. Excludes Natural Sciences Managers (11-9121).
341 363 22 6.45% 6 19 25 27 $66.35
11-9051
[More_Info]
Food Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that serves food and beverages. Excludes Chefs and Head Cooks (35-1011).
595 660 65 10.92% 19 53 72 78 $30.92
11-9071
[More_Info]
Gaming Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate gaming operations in a casino. May formulate house rules.
31 27 -4 -12.9% 1 2 3 3 n/a
11-9081
[More_Info]
Lodging Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that provides lodging and other accommodations. Excludes Food Service Managers (11-9051) in lodging establishments.
213 236 23 10.8% 7 16 23 25 $38.10
11-9111
[More_Info]
Medical and Health Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate medical and health services in hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations, public health agencies, or similar organizations.
962 1036 74 7.69% 24 55 79 86 $58.86
11-9121
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Natural Sciences Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, statistics, and research and development in these fields. Excludes Architecture and Engineering Managers (11-9041) and Computer and Information Systems Managers (11-3021).
196 199 3 1.53% 4 13 17 17 $54.86
11-9141
[More_Info]
Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the selling, buying, leasing, or governance activities of commercial, industrial, or residential real estate properties. Includes managers of homeowner and condominium associations, rented or leased housing units, buildings, or land (including rights-of-way).
601 612 11 1.83% 23 24 47 48 $35.12
11-9151
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Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
334 365 31 9.28% 10 20 30 33 $39.29
11-9161
[More_Info]
Emergency Management Directors
Plan and direct disaster response or crisis management activities, provide disaster preparedness training, and prepare emergency plans and procedures for natural (e.g., hurricanes, floods, earthquakes), wartime, or technological (e.g., nuclear power plant emergencies or hazardous materials spills) disasters or hostage situations.
71 71 0 0% 2 4 6 6 $46.07
11-9199
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Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
1911 1979 68 3.56% 49 98 147 154 n/a

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Office and Administrative Support

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
43-1000
Supervisors, Office and Administrative Support Workers
2062 2151 89 4.32% 79 142 221 230 n/a
43-1011
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of clerical and administrative support workers.
2062 2151 89 4.32% 79 142 221 230 $32.18
43-2000
Communications Equipment Operators
275 301 26 9.45% 15 20 35 38 n/a
43-2011
[More_Info]
Switchboard Operators, Including Answering Service
Operate telephone business systems equipment or switchboards to relay incoming, outgoing, and interoffice calls. May supply information to callers and record messages.
207 225 18 8.7% 12 14 26 28 $16.95
43-2021
[More_Info]
Telephone Operators
Provide information by accessing alphabetical, geographical, or other directories. Assist customers with special billing requests, such as charges to a third party and credits or refunds for incorrectly dialed numbers or bad connections. May handle emergency calls and assist children or people with physical disabilities to make telephone calls.
55 61 6 10.91% 3 5 8 9 n/a
43-3000
Financial Clerks
9100 9443 343 3.77% 482 582 1064 1098 n/a
43-3011
[More_Info]
Bill and Account Collectors
Locate and notify customers of delinquent accounts by mail, telephone, or personal visit to solicit payment. Duties include receiving payment and posting amount to customer's account; preparing statements to credit department if customer fails to respond; initiating repossession proceedings or service disconnection; and keeping records of collection and status of accounts.
359 360 1 0.28% 14 29 43 43 $25.18
43-3021
[More_Info]
Billing and Posting Clerks
Compile, compute, and record billing, accounting, statistical, and other numerical data for billing purposes. Prepare billing invoices for services rendered or for delivery or shipment of goods.
1375 1484 109 7.93% 59 96 155 166 $23.71
43-3031
[More_Info]
Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks
Compute, classify, and record numerical data to keep financial records complete. Perform any combination of routine calculating, posting, and verifying duties to obtain primary financial data for use in maintaining accounting records. May also check the accuracy of figures, calculations, and postings pertaining to business transactions recorded by other workers. Excludes Payroll and Timekeeping Clerks (43-3051).
4765 5025 260 5.46% 298 273 571 597 $23.66
43-3041
[More_Info]
Gaming Cage Workers
In a gaming establishment, conduct financial transactions for patrons. May reconcile daily summaries of transactions to balance books. Accept patron's credit application and verify credit references to provide check-cashing authorization or to establish house credit accounts. May sell gambling chips, tokens, or tickets to patrons, or to other workers for resale to patrons. May convert gaming chips, tokens, or tickets to currency upon patron's request. May use a cash register or computer to record transaction.
52 45 -7 -13.46% 2 4 6 5 n/a
43-3051
[More_Info]
Payroll and Timekeeping Clerks
Compile and record employee time and payroll data. May compute employees' time worked, production, and commission. May compute and post wages and deductions, or prepare paychecks. Excludes Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks (43-3031).
486 520 34 7% 24 32 56 59 $25.08
43-3061
[More_Info]
Procurement Clerks
Compile information and records to draw up purchase orders for procurement of materials and services.
281 289 8 2.85% 10 20 30 31 $25.24
43-3071
[More_Info]
Tellers
Receive and pay out money. Keep records of money and negotiable instruments involved in a financial institution's various transactions.
1125 1080 -45 -4% 54 79 133 128 $17.01
43-3099
[More_Info]
Financial Clerks, All Other
All financial clerks not listed separately.
657 640 -17 -2.59% 21 49 70 68 $23.84
43-4000
Information and Record Clerks
12061 12486 425 3.52% 620 943 1563 1606 n/a
43-4021
[More_Info]
Correspondence Clerks
Compose letters or electronic correspondence in reply to requests for merchandise, damage claims, credit and other information, delinquent accounts, incorrect billings, or unsatisfactory services. Duties may include gathering data to formulate reply and preparing correspondence.
32 29 -3 -9.38% 1 2 3 3 n/a
43-4031
[More_Info]
Court, Municipal, and License Clerks
Perform clerical duties for courts of law, municipalities, or governmental licensing agencies and bureaus. May prepare docket of cases to be called; secure information for judges and court; prepare draft agendas or bylaws for town or city council; answer official correspondence; keep fiscal records and accounts; issue licenses or permits; and record data, administer tests, or collect fees. Clerks of Court are classified in Managers, All Other (11-9199).
567 550 -17 -3% 25 27 52 50 $25.49
43-4041
[More_Info]
Credit Authorizers, Checkers, and Clerks
Authorize credit charges against customers' accounts. Investigate history and credit standing of individuals or business establishments applying for credit. May interview applicants to obtain personal and financial data; determine credit worthiness; process applications; and notify customers of acceptance or rejection of credit.
32 32 0 0% 1 2 3 3 n/a
43-4051
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Customer Service Representatives
Interact with customers to provide information in response to inquiries about products and services and to handle and resolve complaints. Excludes individuals whose duties are primarily installation, sales, or repair.
2617 2663 46 1.76% 127 225 352 357 $19.73
43-4061
[More_Info]
Eligibility Interviewers, Government Programs
Determine eligibility of persons applying to receive assistance from government programs and agency resources, such as welfare, unemployment benefits, social security, and public housing.
681 675 -6 -0.88% 26 38 64 63 $26.62
43-4071
[More_Info]
File Clerks
File correspondence, cards, invoices, receipts, and other records in alphabetical or numerical order or according to the filing system used. Locate and remove material from file when requested.
522 548 26 4.98% 31 35 66 69 $18.38
43-4081
[More_Info]
Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks
Accommodate hotel, motel, and resort patrons by registering and assigning rooms to guests, issuing room keys or cards, transmitting and receiving messages, keeping records of occupied rooms and guests' accounts, making and confirming reservations, and presenting statements to and collecting payments from departing guests.
973 1071 98 10.07% 56 117 173 183 $12.86
43-4111
[More_Info]
Interviewers, Except Eligibility and Loan
Interview persons by telephone, mail, in person, or by other means for the purpose of completing forms, applications, or questionnaires. Ask specific questions, record answers, and assist persons with completing form. May sort, classify, and file forms.
93 108 15 16.13% 5 7 12 14 n/a
43-4121
[More_Info]
Library Assistants, Clerical
Compile records, sort, shelve, issue, and receive library materials such as books, electronic media, pictures, cards, slides and microfilm. Locate library materials for loan and replace material in shelving area, stacks, or files according to identification number and title. Register patrons to permit them to borrow books, periodicals, and other library materials. Excludes Library Technicians (25-4031).
386 373 -13 -3.37% 30 27 57 56 $18.30
43-4131
[More_Info]
Loan Interviewers and Clerks
Interview loan applicants to elicit information; investigate applicants' backgrounds and verify references; prepare loan request papers; and forward findings, reports, and documents to appraisal department. Review loan papers to ensure completeness, and complete transactions between loan establishment, borrowers, and sellers upon approval of loan.
317 307 -10 -3.15% 12 20 32 31 $22.95
43-4141
[More_Info]
New Accounts Clerks
Interview persons desiring to open accounts in financial institutions. Explain account services available to prospective customers and assist them in preparing applications.
37 38 1 2.7% 2 3 5 5 $18.34
43-4151
[More_Info]
Order Clerks
Receive and process incoming orders for materials, merchandise, classified ads, or services such as repairs, installations, or rental of facilities. Generally receives orders via mail, phone, fax, or other electronic means. Duties include informing customers of receipt, prices, shipping dates, and delays; preparing contracts; and handling complaints. Excludes Dispatchers, Except Police, Fire, and Ambulance (43-5032) who both dispatch and take orders for services.
275 283 8 2.91% 12 20 32 33 $21.09
43-4161
[More_Info]
Human Resources Assistants, Except Payroll and Timekeeping
Compile and keep personnel records. Record data for each employee, such as address, weekly earnings, absences, amount of sales or production, supervisory reports, and date of and reason for termination. May prepare reports for employment records, file employment records, or search employee files and furnish information to authorized persons.
544 573 29 5.33% 20 43 63 66 $24.07
43-4171
[More_Info]
Receptionists and Information Clerks
Answer inquiries and provide information to the general public, customers, visitors, and other interested parties regarding activities conducted at establishment and location of departments, offices, and employees within the organization. Excludes Switchboard Operators, Including Answering Service (43-2011).
3063 3287 224 7.31% 185 242 427 449 $17.41
43-4181
[More_Info]
Reservation and Transportation Ticket Agents and Travel Clerks
Make and confirm reservations for transportation or lodging, or sell transportation tickets. May check baggage and direct passengers to designated concourse, pier, or track; deliver tickets, contact individuals and groups to inform them of package tours; or provide tourists with travel or transportation information. Excludes Travel Agents (41-3041), Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks (43-4081), and Cashiers (41-2011) who sell tickets for local transportation.
1049 1061 12 1.14% 44 76 120 121 $21.94
43-4199
[More_Info]
Information and Record Clerks, All Other
All information and record clerks not listed separately.
858 873 15 1.75% 42 58 100 102 $23.32
43-5000
Material Recording, Scheduling, Dispatching, and Distributing Workers
6872 7073 201 2.92% 291 481 772 792 n/a
43-5011
[More_Info]
Cargo and Freight Agents
Expedite and route movement of incoming and outgoing cargo and freight shipments in airline, train, and trucking terminals, and shipping docks. Take orders from customers and arrange pickup of freight and cargo for delivery to loading platform. Prepare and examine bills of lading to determine shipping charges and tariffs.
724 726 2 0.28% 26 43 69 69 $21.29
43-5021
[More_Info]
Couriers and Messengers
Pick up and deliver messages, documents, packages, and other items between offices or departments within an establishment or directly to other business concerns, traveling by foot, bicycle, motorcycle, automobile, or public conveyance. Excludes Light Truck or Delivery Services Drivers (53-3033).
275 275 0 0% 11 15 26 26 $17.50
43-5031
[More_Info]
Police, Fire, and Ambulance Dispatchers
Operate radio, telephone, or computer equipment at emergency response centers. Receive reports from the public of crimes, disturbances, fires, and medical or police emergencies. Relay information to law enforcement and emergency response personnel. May maintain contact with caller until responders arrive.
393 380 -13 -3.31% 14 23 37 36 $29.64
43-5032
[More_Info]
Dispatchers, Except Police, Fire, and Ambulance
Schedule and dispatch workers, work crews, equipment, or service vehicles for conveyance of materials, freight, or passengers, or for normal installation, service, or emergency repairs rendered outside the place of business. Duties may include using radio, telephone, or computer to transmit assignments and compiling statistics and reports on work progress.
621 653 32 5.15% 22 38 60 63 $28.84
43-5041
[More_Info]
Meter Readers, Utilities
Read meter and record consumption of electricity, gas, water, or steam.
53 53 0 0% 2 3 5 5 $31.83
43-5051
[More_Info]
Postal Service Clerks
Perform any combination of tasks in a post office, such as receive letters and parcels; sell postage and revenue stamps, postal cards, and stamped envelopes; fill out and sell money orders; place mail in pigeon holes of mail rack or in bags; and examine mail for correct postage.
427 421 -6 -1.41% 18 15 33 32 $22.10
43-5061
[More_Info]
Production, Planning, and Expediting Clerks
Coordinate and expedite the flow of work and materials within or between departments of an establishment according to production schedule. Duties include reviewing and distributing production, work, and shipment schedules; conferring with department supervisors to determine progress of work and completion dates; and compiling reports on progress of work, inventory levels, costs, and production problems. Excludes Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping (43-5111).
418 442 24 5.74% 14 31 45 47 $26.03
43-5071
[More_Info]
Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks
Verify and maintain records on incoming and outgoing shipments. Prepare items for shipment. Duties include assembling, addressing, stamping, and shipping merchandise or material; receiving, unpacking, verifying and recording incoming merchandise or material; and arranging for the transportation of products. Excludes Stock Clerks and Order Fillers (43-5081) and Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping (43-5111).
1148 1203 55 4.79% 39 77 116 122 $22.01
43-5081
[More_Info]
Stock Clerks and Order Fillers
Receive, store, and issue sales floor merchandise, materials, equipment, and other items from stockroom, warehouse, or storage yard to fill shelves, racks, tables, or customers' orders. May mark prices on merchandise and set up sales displays. Excludes Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand (53-7062), and Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks (43-5071).
2769 2872 103 3.72% 143 233 376 386 n/a
43-5111
[More_Info]
Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping
Weigh, measure, and check materials, supplies, and equipment for the purpose of keeping relevant records. Duties are primarily clerical by nature. Includes workers who collect and keep record of samples of products or materials. Excludes Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers (51-9061).
44 48 4 9.09% 2 3 5 5 n/a
43-6000
Secretaries and Administrative Assistants
7957 8234 277 3.48% 415 491 906 934 n/a
43-6011
[More_Info]
Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative Assistants
Provide high-level administrative support by conducting research, preparing statistical reports, handling information requests, and performing clerical functions such as preparing correspondence, receiving visitors, arranging conference calls, and scheduling meetings. May also train and supervise lower-level clerical staff. Excludes Secretaries (43-6012 through 43-6014).
3209 3353 144 4.49% 168 199 367 381 $29.52
43-6012
[More_Info]
Legal Secretaries
Perform secretarial duties using legal terminology, procedures, and documents. Prepare legal papers and correspondence, such as summonses, complaints, motions, and subpoenas. May also assist with legal research.
394 345 -49 -12.44% 19 22 41 36 $24.81
43-6013
[More_Info]
Medical Secretaries
Perform secretarial duties using specific knowledge of medical terminology and hospital, clinic, or laboratory procedures. Duties may include scheduling appointments, billing patients, and compiling and recording medical charts, reports, and correspondence.
767 836 69 9% 41 49 90 97 $19.61
43-6014
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Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive
Perform routine clerical and administrative functions such as drafting correspondence, scheduling appointments, organizing and maintaining paper and electronic files, or providing information to callers. Excludes legal, medical, and executive secretaries (43-6011 through 43-6013).
3587 3700 113 3.15% 187 221 408 419 $21.40
43-9000
Other Office and Administrative Support Workers
12702 13231 529 4.16% 637 889 1526 1579 n/a
43-9011
[More_Info]
Computer Operators
Monitor and control electronic computer and peripheral electronic data processing equipment to process business, scientific, engineering, and other data according to operating instructions. Monitor and respond to operating and error messages. May enter commands at a computer terminal and set controls on computer and peripheral devices. Excludes Computer Occupations (15-1100) and Data Entry Keyers (43-9021).
184 196 12 6.52% 9 14 23 24 n/a
43-9021
[More_Info]
Data Entry Keyers
Operate data entry device, such as keyboard or photo composing perforator. Duties may include verifying data and preparing materials for printing. Excludes Word Processors and Typists (43-9022).
220 242 22 10% 10 16 26 28 $17.88
43-9022
[More_Info]
Word Processors and Typists
Use word processor, computer or typewriter to type letters, reports, forms, or other material from rough draft, corrected copy, or voice recording. May perform other clerical duties as assigned. Excludes Data Entry Keyers (43-9021), Secretaries and Administrative Assistants (43-6011 through 43-6014), Court Reporters (23-2091), and Medical Transcriptionists (31-9094).
70 69 -1 -1.43% 4 4 8 8 $21.27
43-9031
[More_Info]
Desktop Publishers
Format typescript and graphic elements using computer software to produce publication-ready material.
27 26 -1 -3.7% 1 2 3 3 n/a
43-9041
[More_Info]
Insurance Claims and Policy Processing Clerks
Process new insurance policies, modifications to existing policies, and claims forms. Obtain information from policyholders to verify the accuracy and completeness of information on claims forms, applications and related documents, and company records. Update existing policies and company records to reflect changes requested by policyholders and insurance company representatives. Excludes Claims Adjusters, Examiners, and Investigators (13-1031).
236 223 -13 -5.51% 8 14 22 21 $27.54
43-9051
[More_Info]
Mail Clerks and Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal Service
Prepare incoming and outgoing mail for distribution. Use hand or mail handling machines to time stamp, open, read, sort, and route incoming mail; and address, seal, stamp, fold, stuff, and affix postage to outgoing mail or packages. Duties may also include keeping necessary records and completed forms.
119 121 2 1.68% 6 8 14 14 $17.95
43-9061
[More_Info]
Office Clerks, General
Perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring knowledge of office systems and procedures. Clerical duties may be assigned in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments and may include a combination of answering telephones, bookkeeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing.
6303 6568 265 4.2% 360 411 771 798 $21.34
43-9071
[More_Info]
Office Machine Operators, Except Computer
Operate one or more of a variety of office machines, such as photocopying, photographic, and duplicating machines, or other office machines. Excludes Computer Operators (43-9011), Mail Clerks and Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal Service (43-9051) and Billing and Posting Clerks (43-3021).
40 40 0 0% 2 3 5 5 $9999.99
43-9111
[More_Info]
Statistical Assistants
Compile and compute data according to statistical formulas for use in statistical studies. May perform actuarial computations and compile charts and graphs for use by actuaries. Includes actuarial clerks.
40 41 1 2.5% 2 3 5 5 n/a
43-9199
[More_Info]
Office and Administrative Support Workers, All Other
All office and administrative support workers not listed separately.
5459 5701 242 4.43% 235 414 649 673 $24.76

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Personal Care and Service

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
39-1000
Supervisors, Personal Care and Service Workers
221 229 8 3.62% 9 15 24 25 n/a
39-1010
First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Gaming Workers
46 38 -8 -17.39% 2 5 7 6 n/a
39-1021
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Personal Service Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of personal service workers, such as flight attendants, hairdressers, or caddies.
175 191 16 9.14% 7 10 17 19 n/a
39-2000
Animal Care and Service Workers
509 581 72 14.15% 37 50 87 94 n/a
39-2011
[More_Info]
Animal Trainers
Train animals for riding, harness, security, performance, or obedience, or assisting persons with disabilities. Accustom animals to human voice and contact; and condition animals to respond to commands. Train animals according to prescribed standards for show or competition. May train animals to carry pack loads or work as part of pack team.
79 88 9 11.39% 5 7 12 13 n/a
39-2021
[More_Info]
Nonfarm Animal Caretakers
Feed, water, groom, bathe, exercise, or otherwise care for pets and other nonfarm animals, such as dogs, cats, ornamental fish or birds, zoo animals, and mice. Work in settings such as kennels, animal shelters, zoos, circuses, and aquariums. May keep records of feedings, treatments, and animals received or discharged. May clean, disinfect, and repair cages, pens, or fish tanks. Excludes Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretakers (31-9096).
430 493 63 14.65% 32 43 75 81 $16.34
39-3000
Entertainment Attendants and Related Workers
1509 1437 -72 -4.77% 138 160 298 291 n/a
39-3011
[More_Info]
Gaming Dealers
Operate table games. Stand or sit behind table and operate games of chance by dispensing the appropriate number of cards or blocks to players, or operating other gaming equipment. Distribute winnings or collect players' money or chips. May compare the house's hand against players' hands.
70 61 -9 -12.86% 4 6 10 9 n/a
39-3012
[More_Info]
Gaming and Sports Book Writers and Runners
Post information enabling patrons to wager on various races and sporting events. Assist in the operation of games such as keno and bingo. May operate random number generating equipment and announce the numbers for patrons. Receive, verify, and record patrons' wagers. Scan and process winning tickets presented by patrons and payout winnings for those wagers.
381 332 -49 -12.86% 22 34 56 51 $15.20
39-3019
[More_Info]
Gaming Service Workers, All Other
All gaming service workers not listed separately.
186 164 -22 -11.83% 11 16 27 25 $15.86
39-3031
[More_Info]
Ushers, Lobby Attendants, and Ticket Takers
Assist patrons at entertainment events by performing duties, such as collecting admission tickets and passes from patrons, assisting in finding seats, searching for lost articles, and locating such facilities as rest rooms and telephones.
303 302 -1 -0.33% 40 34 74 74 $12.20
39-3091
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Amusement and Recreation Attendants
Perform a variety of attending duties at amusement or recreation facility. May schedule use of recreation facilities, maintain and provide equipment to participants of sporting events or recreational pursuits, or operate amusement concessions and rides.
465 471 6 1.29% 50 58 108 109 $13.78
39-3099
[More_Info]
Entertainment Attendants and Related Workers, All Other
All entertainment attendants and related workers not listed separately.
76 77 1 1.32% 8 9 17 17 n/a
39-4000
Funeral Service Workers
43 55 12 27.91% 4 3 7 8 n/a
39-4021
[More_Info]
Funeral Attendants
Perform a variety of tasks during funeral, such as placing casket in parlor or chapel prior to service; arranging floral offerings or lights around casket; directing or escorting mourners; closing casket; and issuing and storing funeral equipment.
31 40 9 29.03% 3 2 5 6 n/a
39-5000
Personal Appearance Workers
813 795 -18 -2.21% 48 50 98 96 n/a
39-5012
[More_Info]
Hairdressers, Hairstylists, and Cosmetologists
Provide beauty services, such as shampooing, cutting, coloring, and styling hair, and massaging and treating scalp. May apply makeup, dress wigs, perform hair removal, and provide nail and skin care services. Excludes Makeup Artists, Theatrical and Performance (39-5091), Manicurists and Pedicurists (39-5092), and Skincare Specialists (39-5094).
633 615 -18 -2.84% 38 40 78 76 $14.17
39-5092
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Manicurists and Pedicurists
Clean and shape customers' fingernails and toenails. May polish or decorate nails.
121 120 -1 -0.83% 7 7 14 14 $13.00
39-5094
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Skincare Specialists
Provide skincare treatments to face and body to enhance an individuals appearance. Includes electrologists and laser hair removal specialists.
40 41 1 2.5% 2 2 4 4 $22.71
39-6000
Transportation, Tourism, and Lodging Attendants
301 321 20 6.64% 16 29 45 47 n/a
39-6011
[More_Info]
Baggage Porters and Bellhops
Handle baggage for travelers at transportation terminals or for guests at hotels or similar establishments.
187 200 13 6.95% 10 18 28 29 $11.83
39-6012
[More_Info]
Concierges
Assist patrons at hotel, apartment, or office building with personal services. May take messages, arrange or give advice on transportation, business services or entertainment, or monitor guest requests for housekeeping and maintenance.
114 121 7 6.14% 6 11 17 18 n/a
39-7000
Tour and Travel Guides
891 979 88 9.88% 72 92 164 173 n/a
39-9000
Other Personal Care and Service Workers
9322 10313 991 10.63% 696 736 1432 1531 n/a
39-9011
[More_Info]
Childcare Workers
Attend to children at schools, businesses, private households, and childcare institutions. Perform a variety of tasks, such as dressing, feeding, bathing, and overseeing play. Excludes Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education (25-2011) and Teacher Assistants (25-9041).
1915 1987 72 3.76% 144 147 291 298 $14.40
39-9021
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Personal Care Aides
Assist the elderly, convalescents, or persons with disabilities with daily living activities at the person's home or in a care facility. Duties performed at a place of residence may include keeping house (making beds, doing laundry, washing dishes) and preparing meals. May provide assistance at non-residential care facilities. May advise families, the elderly, convalescents, and persons with disabilities regarding such things as nutrition, cleanliness, and household activities.
5313 6102 789 14.85% 422 374 796 875 n/a
39-9031
[More_Info]
Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors
Instruct or coach groups or individuals in exercise activities. Demonstrate techniques and form, observe participants, and explain to them corrective measures necessary to improve their skills. Excludes teachers classified in 25-0000 Education, Training, and Library Occupations. Excludes Coaches and Scouts (27-2022) and Athletic Trainers (29-9091).
727 783 56 7.7% 45 80 125 131 $18.81
39-9032
[More_Info]
Recreation Workers
Conduct recreation activities with groups in public, private, or volunteer agencies or recreation facilities. Organize and promote activities, such as arts and crafts, sports, games, music, dramatics, social recreation, camping, and hobbies, taking into account the needs and interests of individual members.
745 766 21 2.82% 45 80 125 127 $19.95
39-9041
[More_Info]
Residential Advisors
Coordinate activities in resident facilities in secondary and college dormitories, group homes, or similar establishments. Order supplies and determine need for maintenance, repairs, and furnishings. May maintain household records and assign rooms. May assist residents with problem solving or refer them to counseling resources.
77 76 -1 -1.3% 4 7 11 11 $18.13
39-9099
[More_Info]
Personal Care and Service Workers, All Other
All personal care and service workers not listed separately.
545 599 54 9.91% 36 48 84 89 n/a

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Production

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
51-1000
Supervisors, Production Workers
619 674 55 8.89% 21 46 67 72 n/a
51-1011
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Production and Operating Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of production and operating workers, such as inspectors, precision workers, machine setters and operators, assemblers, fabricators, and plant and system operators. Excludes team or work leaders.
619 674 55 8.89% 21 46 67 72 $36.68
51-2000
Assemblers and Fabricators
211 232 21 9.95% 9 16 25 27 n/a
51-2091
[More_Info]
Fiberglass Laminators and Fabricators
Laminate layers of fiberglass on molds to form boat decks and hulls, bodies for golf carts, automobiles, or other products.
36 40 4 11.11% 2 3 5 5 n/a
51-2098
Assemblers and Fabricators, All Other, Including Team Assemblers
132 141 9 6.82% 6 10 16 17 n/a
51-3000
Food Processing Workers
7333 7960 627 8.55% 326 631 957 1020 n/a
51-3011
[More_Info]
Bakers
Mix and bake ingredients to produce breads, rolls, cookies, cakes, pies, pastries, or other baked goods. Pastry chefs in restaurants and hotels are included with Chefs and Head Cooks (35-1011).
389 426 37 9.51% 24 32 56 60 $16.14
51-3021
[More_Info]
Butchers and Meat Cutters
Cut, trim, or prepare consumer-sized portions of meat for use or sale in retail establishments.
241 251 10 4.15% 10 20 30 31 $23.78
51-3022
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Meat, Poultry, and Fish Cutters and Trimmers
Use hand or hand tools to perform routine cutting and trimming of meat, poultry, and seafood.
6375 6893 518 8.13% 272 548 820 872 $16.05
51-3092
[More_Info]
Food Batchmakers
Set up and operate equipment that mixes or blends ingredients used in the manufacturing of food products. Includes candy makers and cheese makers.
225 270 45 20% 15 22 37 42 $19.26
51-3093
[More_Info]
Food Cooking Machine Operators and Tenders
Operate or tend cooking equipment, such as steam cooking vats, deep fry cookers, pressure cookers, kettles, and boilers, to prepare food products. Excludes Food and Tobacco Roasting, Baking, and Drying Machine Operators and Tenders (51-3091).
28 34 6 21.43% 2 3 5 6 n/a
51-3099
[More_Info]
Food Processing Workers, All Other
All food processing workers not listed separately
53 61 8 15.09% 2 4 6 7 n/a
51-4000
Metal Workers and Plastic Workers
923 1006 83 8.99% 24 78 102 110 n/a
51-4031
[More_Info]
Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Set up, operate, or tend machines to saw, cut, shear, slit, punch, crimp, notch, bend, or straighten metal or plastic material.
31 27 -4 -12.9% 1 2 3 3 n/a
51-4035
[More_Info]
Milling and Planing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Set up, operate, or tend milling or planing machines to mill, plane, shape, groove, or profile metal or plastic work pieces.
25 31 6 24% 1 2 3 4 n/a
51-4041
[More_Info]
Machinists
Set up and operate a variety of machine tools to produce precision parts and instruments. Includes precision instrument makers who fabricate, modify, or repair mechanical instruments. May also fabricate and modify parts to make or repair machine tools or maintain industrial machines, applying knowledge of mechanics, mathematics, metal properties, layout, and machining procedures.
178 196 18 10.11% 6 13 19 21 $30.90
51-4121
[More_Info]
Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers
Use hand-welding, flame-cutting, hand soldering, or brazing equipment to weld or join metal components or to fill holes, indentations, or seams of fabricated metal products.
590 639 49 8.31% 16 52 68 73 $34.55
51-5100
Printing Workers
171 149 -22 -12.87% 8 12 20 18 n/a
51-5112
[More_Info]
Printing Press Operators
Set up and operate digital, letterpress, lithographic, flexographic, gravure, or other printing machines. Includes short-run offset printing presses.
85 74 -11 -12.94% 3 6 9 8 $20.19
51-5113
[More_Info]
Print Binding and Finishing Workers
Bind books and other publications or finish printed products by hand or machine. May set up binding and finishing machines.
63 56 -7 -11.11% 4 4 8 7 $15.04
51-6000
Textile, Apparel, and Furnishings Workers
669 619 -50 -7.47% 40 44 84 79 n/a
51-6011
[More_Info]
Laundry and Dry-Cleaning Workers
Operate or tend washing or dry-cleaning machines to wash or dry-clean industrial or household articles, such as cloth garments, suede, leather, furs, blankets, draperies, linens, rugs, and carpets. Includes spotters and dyers of these articles.
510 479 -31 -6.08% 31 35 66 63 $15.06
51-6021
[More_Info]
Pressers, Textile, Garment, and Related Materials
Press or shape articles by hand or machine.
30 25 -5 -16.67% 1 2 3 2 n/a
51-6031
[More_Info]
Sewing Machine Operators
Operate or tend sewing machines to join, reinforce, decorate, or perform related sewing operations in the manufacture of garment or nongarment products.
54 50 -4 -7.41% 3 3 6 6 n/a
51-7000
Woodworkers
136 140 4 2.94% 6 10 16 16 n/a
51-7011
[More_Info]
Cabinetmakers and Bench Carpenters
Cut, shape, and assemble wooden articles or set up and operate a variety of woodworking machines, such as power saws, jointers, and mortisers to surface, cut, or shape lumber or to fabricate parts for wood products. Excludes Woodworking Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders (51-7040).
47 51 4 8.51% 2 3 5 5 n/a
51-7041
[More_Info]
Sawing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Wood
Set up, operate, or tend wood sawing machines. May operate CNC equipment. Includes lead sawyers.
42 44 2 4.76% 1 4 5 5 $15.84
51-7099
[More_Info]
Woodworkers, All Other
All woodworkers not listed separately.
29 28 -1 -3.45% 2 2 4 4 n/a
51-8000
Plant and System Operators
1899 1952 53 2.79% 48 145 193 198 n/a
51-8012
[More_Info]
Power Distributors and Dispatchers
Coordinate, regulate, or distribute electricity or steam.
48 49 1 2.08% 1 4 5 5 $39.30
51-8013
[More_Info]
Power Plant Operators
Control, operate, or maintain machinery to generate electric power. Includes auxiliary equipment operators. Excludes Nuclear Power Reactor Operators (51-8011).
472 473 1 0.21% 10 34 44 44 $35.92
51-8021
[More_Info]
Stationary Engineers and Boiler Operators
Operate or maintain stationary engines, boilers, or other mechanical equipment to provide utilities for buildings or industrial processes. Operate equipment, such as steam engines, generators, motors, turbines, and steam boilers.
112 123 11 9.82% 4 9 13 14 $35.72
51-8031
[More_Info]
Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant and System Operators
Operate or control an entire process or system of machines, often through the use of control boards, to transfer or treat water or wastewater.
494 516 22 4.45% 15 30 45 47 $31.82
51-8092
[More_Info]
Gas Plant Operators
Distribute or process gas for utility companies and others by controlling compressors to maintain specified pressures on main pipelines.
79 84 5 6.33% 2 7 9 10 $32.18
51-8093
[More_Info]
Petroleum Pump System Operators, Refinery Operators, and Gaugers
Operate or control petroleum refining or processing units. May specialize in controlling manifold and pumping systems, gauging or testing oil in storage tanks, or regulating the flow of oil into pipelines.
398 376 -22 -5.53% 9 34 43 41 $39.97
51-8099
[More_Info]
Plant and System Operators, All Other
All plant and system operators not listed separately.
284 319 35 12.32% 7 26 33 36 $28.93
51-9000
Other Production Occupations
2170 2438 268 12.35% 89 187 276 303 n/a
51-9012
[More_Info]
Separating, Filtering, Clarifying, Precipitating, and Still Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
Set up, operate, or tend continuous flow or vat-type equipment; filter presses; shaker screens; centrifuges; condenser tubes; precipitating, fermenting, or evaporating tanks; scrubbing towers; or batch stills. These machines extract, sort, or separate liquids, gases, or solids from other materials to recover a refined product. Includes dairy processing equipment operators. Excludes Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders (51-9011).
59 97 38 64.41% 2 7 9 13 $25.83
51-9021
[More_Info]
Crushing, Grinding, and Polishing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
Set up, operate, or tend machines to crush, grind, or polish materials, such as coal, glass, grain, stone, food, or rubber.
75 94 19 25.33% 3 7 10 12 n/a
51-9023
[More_Info]
Mixing and Blending Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
Set up, operate, or tend machines to mix or blend materials, such as chemicals, tobacco, liquids, color pigments, or explosive ingredients. Excludes Food Batchmakers (51-3092).
28 44 16 57.14% 1 3 4 6 n/a
51-9032
[More_Info]
Cutting and Slicing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
Set up, operate, or tend machines that cut or slice materials, such as glass, stone, cork, rubber, tobacco, food, paper, or insulating material. Excludes Woodworking Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders (51-7040), Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic (51-4031), and Textile Cutting Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders (51-6062).
37 40 3 8.11% 2 3 5 5 n/a
51-9061
[More_Info]
Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers
Inspect, test, sort, sample, or weigh nonagricultural raw materials or processed, machined, fabricated, or assembled parts or products for defects, wear, and deviations from specifications. May use precision measuring instruments and complex test equipment.
224 254 30 13.39% 9 20 29 32 $34.43
51-9081
[More_Info]
Dental Laboratory Technicians
Construct and repair full or partial dentures or dental appliances. Excludes Dental Assistants (31-9091).
58 64 6 10.34% 3 5 8 9 $22.10
51-9111
[More_Info]
Packaging and Filling Machine Operators and Tenders
Operate or tend machines to prepare industrial or consumer products for storage or shipment. Includes cannery workers who pack food products.
78 111 33 42.31% 4 7 11 14 $16.86
51-9122
[More_Info]
Painters, Transportation Equipment
Operate or tend painting machines to paint surfaces of transportation equipment, such as automobiles, buses, trucks, trains, boats, and airplanes. Includes painters in auto body repair facilities.
59 66 7 11.86% 2 5 7 8 n/a
51-9151
[More_Info]
Photographic Process Workers and Processing Machine Operators
Perform work involved in developing and processing photographic images from film or digital media. May perform precision tasks such as editing photographic negatives and prints.
52 54 2 3.85% 2 6 8 8 n/a
51-9198
[More_Info]
Helpers--Production Workers
Help production workers by performing duties requiring less skill. Duties include supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Apprentice workers are classified in the appropriate production occupations (51-0000).
160 174 14 8.75% 9 16 25 26 $16.85
51-9199
[More_Info]
Production Workers, All Other
All production workers not listed separately.
1180 1266 86 7.29% 46 96 142 151 $26.27

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Protective Service

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
33-1000
First-Line Supervisors/Managers, Protective Service Workers
535 526 -9 -1.68% 15 22 37 36 n/a
33-1011
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Correctional Officers
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of correctional officers and jailers.
85 85 0 0% 3 3 6 6 $46.97
33-1012
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Police and Detectives
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of members of police force.
260 250 -10 -3.85% 6 10 16 15 $61.35
33-1021
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Fire Fighting and Prevention Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of workers engaged in fire fighting and fire prevention and control.
145 144 -1 -0.69% 4 6 10 10 $40.36
33-1099
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Protective Service Workers, All Other
All protective service supervisors not listed separately above.
45 47 2 4.44% 2 3 5 5 n/a
33-2000
Fire Fighting and Prevention Workers
1460 1421 -39 -2.67% 27 72 99 95 n/a
33-2011
[More_Info]
Firefighters
Control and extinguish fires or respond to emergency situations where life, property, or the environment is at risk. Duties may include fire prevention, emergency medical service, hazardous material response, search and rescue, and disaster assistance.
1440 1402 -38 -2.64% 26 71 97 93 $27.39
33-3000
Law Enforcement Workers
2999 2911 -88 -2.93% 89 140 229 220 n/a
33-3011
[More_Info]
Bailiffs
Maintain order in courts of law.
68 66 -2 -2.94% 3 3 6 6 n/a
33-3012
[More_Info]
Correctional Officers and Jailers
Guard inmates in penal or rehabilitative institutions in accordance with established regulations and procedures. May guard prisoners in transit between jail, courtroom, prison, or other point. Includes deputy sheriffs and police who spend the majority of their time guarding prisoners in correctional institutions.
1283 1243 -40 -3.12% 48 63 111 107 $32.20
33-3021
[More_Info]
Detectives and Criminal Investigators
Conduct investigations related to suspected violations of Federal, State, or local laws to prevent or solve crimes. Excludes Private Detectives and Investigators (33-9021).
104 103 -1 -0.96% 2 4 6 6 $60.74
33-3031
[More_Info]
Fish and Game Wardens
Patrol assigned area to prevent fish and game law violations. Investigate reports of damage to crops or property by wildlife. Compile biological data.
239 236 -3 -1.26% 6 11 17 17 n/a
33-3051
[More_Info]
Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers
Maintain order and protect life and property by enforcing local, tribal, State, or Federal laws and ordinances. Perform a combination of the following duties: patrol a specific area; direct traffic; issue traffic summonses; investigate accidents; apprehend and arrest suspects, or serve legal processes of courts.
1283 1242 -41 -3.2% 30 58 88 84 $42.37
33-9000
Other Protective Service Workers
3945 4281 336 8.52% 268 326 594 628 n/a
33-9011
[More_Info]
Animal Control Workers
Handle animals for the purpose of investigations of mistreatment, or control of abandoned, dangerous, or unattended animals.
65 63 -2 -3.08% 3 3 6 6 $26.91
33-9032
[More_Info]
Security Guards
Guard, patrol, or monitor premises to prevent theft, violence, or infractions of rules. May operate x-ray and metal detector equipment. Excludes Transportation Security Screeners (33-9093).
2449 2768 319 13.03% 133 203 336 368 $20.90
33-9091
[More_Info]
Crossing Guards
Guide or control vehicular or pedestrian traffic at such places as streets, schools, railroad crossings, or construction sites.
61 65 4 6.56% 7 3 10 10 $28.36
33-9092
[More_Info]
Lifeguards, Ski Patrol, and Other Recreational Protective Service
Monitor recreational areas, such as pools, beaches, or ski slopes to provide assistance and protection to participants.
526 529 3 0.57% 69 58 127 127 $16.86
33-9093
[More_Info]
Transportation Security Screeners
Conduct screening of passengers, baggage, or cargo to ensure compliance with Transportation Security Administration (TSA) regulations. May operate basic security equipment such as x-ray machines and hand wands at screening checkpoints.
540 539 -1 -0.19% 22 28 50 50 $25.75
33-9099
[More_Info]
Protective Service Workers, All Other
All protective service workers not listed separately.
239 245 6 2.51% 32 27 59 60 n/a

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Sales and Related

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
41-1000
Supervisors, Sales Workers
1977 2023 46 2.33% 69 149 218 223 n/a
41-1011
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of retail sales workers in an establishment or department. Duties may include management functions, such as purchasing, budgeting, accounting, and personnel work, in addition to supervisory duties.
1836 1880 44 2.4% 64 140 204 208 $24.74
41-1012
[More_Info]
First-Line Supervisors of Non-Retail Sales Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of sales workers other than retail sales workers. May perform duties, such as budgeting, accounting, and personnel work, in addition to supervisory duties.
141 143 2 1.42% 5 9 14 14 $34.82
41-2000
Retail Sales Workers
22142 22775 633 2.86% 1502 2050 3552 3615 n/a
41-2011
[More_Info]
Cashiers
Receive and disburse money in establishments other than financial institutions. May use electronic scanners, cash registers, or related equipment. May process credit or debit card transactions and validate checks. Excludes Gaming Cage Persons and Booth Cashiers (41-2012).
7024 7266 242 3.45% 638 710 1348 1372 $14.39
41-2012
[More_Info]
Gaming Change Persons and Booth Cashiers
Exchange coins, tokens and chips for patrons' money. May issue payoffs and obtain customer's signature on receipt. May operate a booth in the slot machine area and furnish change persons with money bank at the start of the shift, or count and audit money in drawers. Excludes Cashiers (41-2011).
66 62 -4 -6.06% 6 6 12 12 $15.35
41-2021
[More_Info]
Counter and Rental Clerks
Receive orders, generally in person, for repairs, rentals, and services. May describe available options, compute cost, and accept payment. Excludes Counter Attendants, Cafeteria, Food Concession, and Coffee Shop (35-3022), Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks (43-4081), Order Clerks (43-4151), and Reservation and Transportation Ticket Agents and Travel Clerks (43-4181).
884 928 44 4.98% 46 70 116 120 $18.05
41-2022
[More_Info]
Parts Salespersons
Sell spare and replacement parts and equipment in repair shop or parts store.
756 798 42 5.56% 32 62 94 98 $22.25
41-2031
[More_Info]
Retail Salespersons
Sell merchandise, such as furniture, motor vehicles, appliances, or apparel to consumers. Excludes Cashiers (41-2011).
13412 13721 309 2.3% 780 1202 1982 2013 $16.11
41-3000
Sales Representatives, Services
1686 1671 -15 -0.89% 55 145 200 198 n/a
41-3011
[More_Info]
Advertising Sales Agents
Sell or solicit advertising space, time, or media in publications, signage, TV, radio, or Internet establishments or public spaces.
252 247 -5 -1.98% 8 26 34 34 $24.36
41-3021
[More_Info]
Insurance Sales Agents
Sell life, property, casualty, health, automotive, or other types of insurance. May refer clients to independent brokers, work as an independent broker, or be employed by an insurance company.
337 327 -10 -2.97% 12 20 32 31 $32.41
41-3031
[More_Info]
Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents
Buy and sell securities or commodities in investment and trading firms, or provide financial services to businesses and individuals. May advise customers about stocks, bonds, mutual funds, commodities, and market conditions.
165 160 -5 -3.03% 4 11 15 14 $33.08
41-3041
[More_Info]
Travel Agents
Plan and sell transportation and accommodations for travel agency customers. Determine destination, modes of transportation, travel dates, costs, and accommodations required. May also describe, plan, and arrange itineraries and sell tour packages. May assist in resolving clients travel problems.
140 146 6 4.29% 8 11 19 20 $22.34
41-3099
[More_Info]
Sales Representatives, Services, All Other
All services sales representatives not listed separately.
792 791 -1 -0.13% 23 77 100 100 n/a
41-4000
Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing
1430 1457 27 1.89% 44 108 152 155 n/a
41-4011
[More_Info]
Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Products
Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers where technical or scientific knowledge is required in such areas as biology, engineering, chemistry, and electronics, normally obtained from at least 2 years of post-secondary education. Excludes Sales Engineers (41-9031).
268 268 0 0% 8 20 28 28 $40.59
41-4012
[More_Info]
Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Except Technical and Scientific Products
Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers to businesses or groups of individuals. Work requires substantial knowledge of items sold.
1162 1189 27 2.32% 36 88 124 127 $29.48
41-9000
Other Sales and Related Workers
2380 2507 127 5.34% 124 198 322 335 n/a
41-9011
[More_Info]
Demonstrators and Product Promoters
Demonstrate merchandise and answer questions for the purpose of creating public interest in buying the product. May sell demonstrated merchandise.
283 338 55 19.43% 31 22 53 58 $17.05
41-9012
[More_Info]
Models
Model garments or other apparel and accessories for prospective buyers at fashion shows, private showings, or retail establishments. May pose for photos to be used in magazines or advertisements. May pose as subject for paintings, sculptures, and other types of artistic expression.
33 32 -1 -3.03% 3 2 5 5 n/a
41-9021
[More_Info]
Real Estate Brokers
Operate real estate office, or work for commercial real estate firm, overseeing real estate transactions. Other duties usually include selling real estate or renting properties and arranging loans.
42 41 -1 -2.38% 2 2 4 4 $34.76
41-9022
[More_Info]
Real Estate Sales Agents
Rent, buy, or sell property for clients. Perform duties, such as study property listings, interview prospective clients, accompany clients to property site, discuss conditions of sale, and draw up real estate contracts. Includes agents who represent buyer.
186 187 1 0.54% 8 9 17 17 $36.47
41-9031
[More_Info]
Sales Engineers
Sell business goods or services, the selling of which requires a technical background equivalent to a baccalaureate degree in engineering. Excludes Engineers (17-2011 through 17-2199) whose primary function is not marketing or sales.
53 54 1 1.89% 1 5 6 6 n/a
41-9041
[More_Info]
Telemarketers
Solicit donations or orders for goods or services over the telephone.
50 48 -2 -4% 2 5 7 7 n/a
41-9091
[More_Info]
Door-to-Door Sales Workers, News and Street Vendors, and Related Workers
Sell goods or services door-to-door or on the street.
50 54 4 8% 3 3 6 6 n/a
41-9099
[More_Info]
Sales and Related Workers, All Other
All sales and related workers not listed separately.
1683 1753 70 4.16% 74 150 224 231 $15.70

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Transportation and Material Moving

SOC Occupation Title 2018 2028 Growth Percent Change Labor force
exits
Occupation
transfers
Total Openings, Annual Average Alaska Mean Wage
53-1000
Supervisors, Transportation and Material Moving Workers
865 919 54 6.24% 28 67 95 100 n/a
53-1011
[More_Info]
Aircraft Cargo Handling Supervisors
Supervise and coordinate the activities of ground crew in the loading, unloading, securing, and staging of aircraft cargo or baggage. May determine the quantity and orientation of cargo and compute aircraft center of gravity. May accompany aircraft as member of flight crew and monitor and handle cargo in flight, and assist and brief passengers on safety and emergency procedures. Includes loadmasters.
180 192 12 6.67% 6 14 20 21 n/a
53-1048
First-line Supervisors of Transportation and Material Moving Workers, Except Aircraft Cargo Handling Supervisors
685 727 42 6.13% 22 53 75 79 n/a
53-2000
Air Transportation Workers
3994 4076 82 2.05% 122 290 412 420 n/a
53-2011
[More_Info]
Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers
Pilot and navigate the flight of fixed-wing, multi-engine aircraft, usually on scheduled air carrier routes, for the transport of passengers and cargo. Requires Federal Air Transport certificate and rating for specific aircraft type used. Includes regional, National, and international airline pilots and flight instructors of airline pilots.
2083 2163 80 3.84% 59 157 216 224 n/a
53-2012
[More_Info]
Commercial Pilots
Pilot and navigate the flight of fixed-wing aircraft on nonscheduled air carrier routes, or helicopters. Requires Commercial Pilot certificate. Includes charter pilots with similar certification, and air ambulance and air tour pilots. Excludes regional, National, and international airline pilots.
932 939 7 0.75% 26 69 95 96 n/a
53-2021
[More_Info]
Air Traffic Controllers
Control air traffic on and within vicinity of airport and movement of air traffic between altitude sectors and control centers according to established procedures and policies. Authorize, regulate, and control commercial airline flights according to government or company regulations to expedite and ensure flight safety.
448 447 -1 -0.22% 11 31 42 42 $55.43
53-2022
[More_Info]
Airfield Operations Specialists
Ensure the safe takeoff and landing of commercial and military aircraft. Duties include coordination between air-traffic control and maintenance personnel; dispatching; using airfield landing and navigational aids; implementing airfield safety procedures; monitoring and maintaining flight records; and applying knowledge of weather information.
68 69 1 1.47% 2 5 7 7 $9999.99
53-2031
[More_Info]
Flight Attendants
Provide personal services to ensure the safety, security, and comfort of airline passengers during flight. Greet passengers, verify tickets, explain use of safety equipment, and serve food or beverages.
463 458 -5 -1.08% 24 28 52 52 n/a
53-3000
Motor Vehicle Operators
7699 8318 619 8.04% 431 523 954 1016 n/a
53-3021
[More_Info]
Bus Drivers, Transit and Intercity
Drive bus or motor coach, including regular route operations, charters, and private carriage. May assist passengers with baggage. May collect fares or tickets.
977 1032 55 5.63% 78 49 127 132 n/a
53-3022
[More_Info]
Bus Drivers, School or Special Client
Transport students or special clients, such as the elderly or persons with disabilities. Ensure adherence to safety rules. May assist passengers in boarding or exiting.
1133 1224 91 8.03% 91 57 148 157 n/a
53-3031
[More_Info]
Driver/Sales Workers
Drive truck or other vehicle over established routes or within an established territory and sell or deliver goods, such as food products, including restaurant take-out items, or pick up or deliver items such as commercial laundry. May also take orders, collect payment, or stock merchandise at point of delivery. Includes newspaper delivery drivers. Excludes Coin, Vending, and Amusement Machine Servicers and Repairers (49-9091) and Light Truck or Delivery Services Drivers (53-3033).
785 867 82 10.45% 34 60 94 102 $17.56
53-3032
[More_Info]
Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers
Drive a tractor-trailer combination or a truck with a capacity of at least 26,000 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW). May be required to unload truck. Requires commercial drivers' license.
2767 2994 227 8.2% 119 209 328 351 $28.70
53-3033
[More_Info]
Light Truck or Delivery Services Drivers
Drive a light vehicle, such as a truck or van, with a capacity of less than 26,000 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW), primarily to deliver or pick up merchandise or to deliver packages. May load and unload vehicle. Excludes Couriers and Messengers (43-5021) and Driver/Sales Workers (53-3031).
1514 1648 134 8.85% 65 115 180 193 $24.25
53-3041
[More_Info]
Taxi Drivers and Chauffeurs
Drive automobiles, vans, or limousines to transport passengers. May occasionally carry cargo. Includes hearse drivers. Excludes Ambulance Drivers and Attendants, Except Emergency Medical Technicians (53-3011) and Bus Drivers (53-3020).
208 225 17 8.17% 12 12 24 26 n/a
53-3099
[More_Info]
Motor Vehicle Operators, All Other
All motor vehicle operators not listed separately.
311 324 13 4.18% 32 21 53 54 $9999.99
53-4000
Rail Transportation Workers
134 138 4 2.99% 4 9 13 13 n/a
53-4011
[More_Info]
Locomotive Engineers
Drive electric, diesel-electric, steam, or gas-turbine-electric locomotives to transport passengers or freight. Interpret train orders, electronic or manual signals, and railroad rules and regulations.
67 69 2 2.99% 2 4 6 6 n/a
53-4021
[More_Info]
Railroad Brake, Signal, and Switch Operators
Operate railroad track switches. Couple or uncouple rolling stock to make up or break up trains. Signal engineers by hand or flagging. May inspect couplings, air hoses, journal boxes, and hand brakes.
29 29 0 0% 1 2 3 3 n/a
53-4031
[More_Info]
Railroad Conductors and Yardmasters
Coordinate activities of switch-engine crew within railroad yard, industrial plant, or similar location. Conductors coordinate activities of train crew on passenger or freight trains. Yardmasters review train schedules and switching orders and coordinate activities of workers engaged in railroad traffic operations, such as the makeup or breakup of trains and yard switching.
33 34 1 3.03% 1 3 4 4 n/a
53-5000
Water Transportation Workers
1669 1750 81 4.85% 48 142 190 198 n/a
53-5011
[More_Info]
Sailors and Marine Oilers
Stand watch to look for obstructions in path of vessel, measure water depth, turn wheel on bridge, or use emergency equipment as directed by captain, mate, or pilot. Break out, rig, overhaul, and store cargo-handling gear, stationary rigging, and running gear. Perform a variety of maintenance tasks to preserve the painted surface of the ship and to maintain line and ship equipment. Must hold government-issued certification and tankerman certification when working aboard liquid-carrying vessels. Includes able seamen and ordinary seamen.
727 759 32 4.4% 22 70 92 95 $23.73
53-5021
[More_Info]
Captains, Mates, and Pilots of Water Vessels
Command or supervise operations of ships and water vessels, such as tugboats and ferryboats. Required to hold license issued by U.S. Coast Guard. Excludes Motorboat Operators (53-5022).
642 681 39 6.07% 17 45 62 66 $45.57
53-5022
[More_Info]
Motorboat Operators
Operate small motor-driven boats. May assist in navigational activities.
33 36 3 9.09% 1 2 3 3 n/a
53-5031
[More_Info]
Ship Engineers
Supervise and coordinate activities of crew engaged in operating and maintaining engines, boilers, deck machinery, and electrical, sanitary, and refrigeration equipment aboard ship.
267 274 7 2.62% 8 25 33 34 $35.73
53-6000
Other Transportation Workers
2146 2230 84 3.91% 110 155 265 273 n/a
53-6021
[More_Info]
Parking Lot Attendants
Park vehicles or issue tickets for customers in a parking lot or garage. May collect fee.
122 135 13 10.66% 7 13 20 21 $14.41
53-6031
[More_Info]
Automotive and Watercraft Service Attendants
Service automobiles, buses, trucks, boats, and other automotive or marine vehicles with fuel, lubricants, and accessories. Collect payment for services and supplies. May lubricate vehicle, change motor oil, install antifreeze, or replace lights or other accessories, such as windshield wiper blades or fan belts. May repair or replace tires.
249 256 7 2.81% 11 26 37 38 $16.39
53-6051
[More_Info]
Transportation Inspectors
Inspect equipment or goods in connection with the safe transport of cargo or people. Includes rail transportation inspectors, such as freight inspectors; rail inspectors; and other inspectors of transportation vehicles, not elsewhere classified. Excludes Transportation Security Screeners (33-9093).
194 193 -1 -0.52% 6 14 20 20 $52.37
53-6061
[More_Info]
Transportation Attendants, Except Flight Attendants
Provide services to ensure the safety and comfort of passengers aboard ships, buses, trains, or within the station or terminal. Perform duties such as greeting passengers, explaining the use of safety equipment, serving meals or beverages, or answering questions related to travel. Excludes Baggage Porters and Bellhops (39-6011).
683 716 33 4.83% 55 37 92 95 $21.74
53-6099
[More_Info]
Transportation Workers, All Other
All transportation workers not listed separately.
883 915 32 3.62% 31 64 95 98 n/a
53-7000
Material Moving Workers
9339 9790 451 4.83% 445 838 1283 1328 n/a
53-7021
[More_Info]
Crane and Tower Operators
Operate mechanical boom and cable or tower and cable equipment to lift and move materials, machines, or products in many directions. Excludes Excavating and Loading Machine and Dragline Operators (53-7032).
81 87 6 7.41% 3 7 10 11 $34.37
53-7032
[More_Info]
Excavating and Loading Machine and Dragline Operators
Operate or tend machinery equipped with scoops, shovels, or buckets, to excavate and load loose materials. Excludes Dredge Operators (53-7031).
231 251 20 8.66% 9 20 29 31 n/a
53-7041
[More_Info]
Hoist and Winch Operators
Operate or tend hoists or winches to lift and pull loads using power-operated cable equipment. Excludes Crane and Tower Operators (53-7021).
26 26 0 0% 1 2 3 3 n/a
53-7051
[More_Info]
Industrial Truck and Tractor Operators
Operate industrial trucks or tractors equipped to move materials around a warehouse, storage yard, factory, construction site, or similar location. Excludes Logging Equipment Operators (45-4022).
344 370 26 7.56% 11 29 40 43 $26.04
53-7061
[More_Info]
Cleaners of Vehicles and Equipment
Wash or otherwise clean vehicles, machinery, and other equipment. Use such materials as water, cleaning agents, brushes, cloths, and hoses. Excludes Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners (37-2011).
728 796 68 9.34% 38 73 111 118 $14.71
53-7062
[More_Info]
Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand
Manually move freight, stock, or other materials or perform other general labor. Includes all manual laborers not elsewhere classified. Excludes Material Moving Workers (53-7011 through 53-7199) who use power equipment. Excludes Construction Laborers (47-2061) and Helpers, Construction Trades (47-3011 through 47-3019).
4207 4453 246 5.85% 196 406 602 627 $21.02
53-7063
[More_Info]
Machine Feeders and Offbearers
Feed materials into or remove materials from machines or equipment that is automatic or tended by other workers.
38 35 -3 -7.89% 2 3 5 5 n/a
53-7064
[More_Info]
Packers and Packagers, Hand
Pack or package by hand a wide variety of products and materials.
595 627 32 5.38% 37 51 88 91 $17.01
53-7071
[More_Info]
Gas Compressor and Gas Pumping Station Operators
Operate steam, gas, electric motor, or internal combustion engine driven compressors. Transmit, compress, or recover gases, such as butane, nitrogen, hydrogen, and natural gas.
90 93 3 3.33% 3 8 11 11 n/a
53-7072
[More_Info]
Pump Operators, Except Wellhead Pumpers
Tend, control, or operate power-driven, stationary, or portable pumps and manifold systems to transfer gases, oil, other liquids, slurries, or powdered materials to and from various vessels and processes.
34 36 2 5.88% 1 3 4 4 $29.34
53-7081
[More_Info]
Refuse and Recyclable Material Collectors
Collect and dump refuse or recyclable materials from containers into truck. May drive truck.
269 271 2 0.74% 15 23 38 38 $22.08
53-7121
[More_Info]
Tank Car, Truck, and Ship Loaders
Load and unload chemicals and bulk solids, such as coal, sand, and grain into or from tank cars, trucks, or ships using material moving equipment. May perform a variety of other tasks relating to shipment of products. May gauge or sample shipping tanks and test them for leaks.
204 202 -2 -0.98% 10 16 26 26 n/a
53-7199
[More_Info]
Material Moving Workers, All Other
All material moving workers not listed separately.
2448 2492 44 1.8% 118 193 311 315 $23.68

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Employment 2018:

The base year of the forecast cycle. Base-year employment estimates are required to develop the employment projections and the base-year employment matrix.

Employment 2028:

The target, or ending, year of the forecast cycle. In order to produce target-year occupational projections, a change factor is developed and applied to each occupation. An occupational staffing pattern is then applied to the projected industry total of each occupation to give a target-year occupational projection.

Growth:

The difference between the employment in the forecast year and the base year.

Percent Change:

Numeric change divided by the base year employment. This number can be deceptive. A large percentage change does not necessarily mean a large number of jobs. For instance, if the base year for an occupation is 20 and the forecast year shows an increase of 10, it is a 50 percent increase. In reality, it is only 10 jobs.

Labor force exits:

A labor force exit occurs when a worker leaves an occupation, creating a vacancy for another worker to fill.

Occupational transfers:

An occupational transfer occurs when an employee takes a job with a new employer but remains in the same occupation.

Occupational openings, annual average:

The occupational openings are the sum of the growth, exits, and transfers. The annual average is that total divided by the number of years.

Mean Wage:

The estimated total wages for an occupation divided by its weighted survey employment. It is sometimes referred to as the “weighted average.”

Standard Occupational Classification System (SOC):

Alaska’s Occupational Database (ODB) uses the SOC occupational classification system. The SOC system categorizes over 800 occupations into 23 major occupational groups.